Skip to main content

Full text of "A treatise on lace-making, embroidery, and needle-work with Irish flax threads"

See other formats





Barbours 

Prize Needlework • 
Series ••.•>**• 

A Treatise onLACEAAKING 

EttBROIDERYand NEEDLEWORK 
with 

IRI5H RAX THREADS 



Published by 

the barbour 
Bros. co. 




Price Ten Cents 



NUMBERSEVEN 



HIGHEST AWARDS • WORLD'S FAIR 
ESTABLISHED 1784. 



1893. 



Gold Medal Threads are the Best. *|* Read the Record of Highest Awards. 





STIRLING 
AND FRAN CINE 

C1AR1C 
ART INSTITUTE 
LlBRARr 




BARBOUR'S THREADS 



HAVE STOOD THE 
TEST FOR MORE THAN 



A CENTURY. 



THREAD WORKS: 
PATERSON, NEW JERSEY. LISBURN, IRELAND. OTTENSEN, GERMANY 



stores: 

New York, 48 & 50 White St. Boston, 226 Devonshire St. 

Chicago, 108 & 110 Franklin St. St. Louis, 717 & 719 Lucas Ave. 

Philadelphia, 410 Arch St. Cincinnati, 118 East 6th St. 

San Francisco, 517 & 519 Market St. . 

Also in London, Manchester, Glasgow, Dublin, Paris, Hamburg:, Montreal, Melbourne, 
Sydney, Brussels, Amsterdam, Madrid, Milan and Naples. 

Forming- collectively a Flax Thread industry employing jooo persons or as large as any 

tzvo other Linen Thread firms. 

ASK FOR BARBOUR'S. INSIST UPON HAVING IT. SOLO EVERYWHERE; 



BOOK NO. 7 



BARBOUR'S 



PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES 



A TREATISE 



LACE-MAKING AND EMBROIDERY 




PUBLISHED BY 

THE BARBOUR BROTHERS COMPANY. 

1900. 






BOOKS No. i, No. 2, No. 3, No. 4, No. 5, No. 6, and No. 7, 

ALSO 

BOOK OF INSTRUCTION IN MACRAME LACE-MAKING 

AND THE NEW ILLUSTRATED HANDBOOK OF 

TORCHON (OR BOBBIN) LACE-WORK, 

will be sent to any address on receipt of ten cents each. In the 
Prize Needle-work Series no patterns are duplicated, and the whole 
form a compendium of the choicest designs. 



If customers find difficulty in procuring Barbour's Irish Flax 
Threads and Flosses from their local stores, it will be sent from The 
Linen Thread Company, New York, postpaid, at prices below. 
We shall be pleased if our friends will kindly give, when writing, 
addresses of dealers to whom application for the threads has been 
made : 

3-cord, 200-yards spools, dark-blue, white, whited-brown 

(or ecru), and drabs, spool 10 cents. 

3-cord carpet thread, any color, skein 3 cents. 

00 Ulster rope linen floss, 80 shades, skein 5 cents. 

No. 4 etching flax, any color, 80 shades, 2 skeins . . . 5 cents. 

Color book, containing full line of shades 10 cents. 

White Star flossette, sizes *, * # , ## *, and ****, skein . . 5 cents. 
New Irish flax lace threads, 3-cord, 200-yards spools, No. 

120 and No. 150, spool 10 cents. 

New Honiton lace thread, 2 -cord, 200-yards spools, No. 

250, very fine and strong, and serviceable also for the 

finest knitting, crocheting, and other lace-work, spool, 10 cents. 
Crochet thread, gray, ecru, and white : 

Nos. 16, 18, 20, and 25, ball 15 cents. 

Nos. 30, 35, 40, and 50, ball 20 cents. 

Nos. 60 and 70, ball .25 cents. 

Flax macrame, 4-ounce ball 25 cents. 

New Ulster (or Russian) braid, per yard, 5 cents ; 12 yards, 50 cents. 



Copyright, 1900, boston 

The Barbour Brothers Company. 



CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

PUBLISHERS' NOTICE ... 4 

EXPLANATION OF TERMS . 8 
LACE MAKING AND EM- 
BROIDERY: 

Alphabet Lace 9 

Picot Point Lace . . . . 10 

Ivy Lace 12 

Lace for Sideboard Scarf . 14 
Florida Shell Lace for 

Handkerchief . . . . 16 

Table or Toilet Mats . . 18 

Square for Bedspread . . 20 

Plate Doily 23 

Gentlemen's Suspenders . 24 
Doily, in Roll and Knot 

Stitch 26 

Hexagon Doily 28 

Fancy Work-bag .... 30 

Child's Bonnet 31 

Infant's Bonnet . . . . 33 

Tumbler or Bonbon Doily . 36 

Leaf and Star Centre-piece 37 

Handkerchief Border . . 39 

Doily with Maltese Braid 42 

English Point, Leaf Lace . 43 

Corset-cover Yoke ... 46 

Rose-leaf and Fern Lace . 48 

Tatted Doily 49 

Child's Tatted Yoke ... 50 

Netted Doilies 51 

Bobbin Laces 54 

Diamond Lace 56 

Edging 59 

Insertion 60 

Mexican Border .... 61 
Doily, in Drawn-work and 

Crochet 63 

Corner, in Swedish Drawn- 
work 64 



PAGE 

Square, in Drawn-work . 65 
Five O'Clock Tea-cloth 

with Cut-work Border . 66 
Square, in Roman Em- 
broidery 68 

Sailor Collar, in Roman 

Embroidery 69 

Work-bag 70 

Table Cover 71 

Centre-piece and Doilies, 

Colonial Design . . . . y^ 
Sofa-pillow, in Outline and 

Cross-stitch Embroidery 75 

Sofa Pillow 76 

Fleur-de-Lis Doily . . . yy 

Square for Small Table . yS 

Sofa Pillow 80 

Centre-piece, in Cross- 
stitch 81 

Photograph Frames ... 82 
Curtains with Renaissance 

Lace and Insertion . . 85 

Infant's Pillow .... 87 

Russian Centre-piece . . 89 

Yoke, in Renaissance Lace 90 

Lady's Corsage Collar . . 91 
Dresser Scarf, in Royal 

Battenburg 92 

Point Lace Handkerchiefs 93 
Renaissance Lace Centre- 
piece 96 

Point Lace Fan .... 97 
Dress Front, in Battenburg 

Lace 98 

Rose Doily 99 

Handkerchief, in Thread 

Lace 100 

Renaissance Centre-piece . 101 




1784 IwHflaxBEU 1900 



And again, to our friends and patrons in this and other lands, a 
hearty All-hail ! 

When No. 6 of the Prize Needlework Series was issued, meeting 
so eager a welcome from ladies everywhere, we had no thought 
that No. 7 would not follow it in the regular course of issue. Dur- 
ing 1898, however, important changes in business methods and 
location took place, requiring the closest attention of the Barbour 
Brothers Company, — changes which while advantageous to the 
manufacturers of linen threads and flosses, are quite as much so to 
the great purchasing public served with these products. By and 
through the changes referred to has come a saving in rents and 
minor details, and in labor, — always to be favorably considered, 
since useless labor is a waste, — as well as a more extended applica- 
tion of the very latest improvements in machinery, all combining to 
facilitate the production of the best possible goods at the lowest 
possible prices. 

So it is not until the dawn of the new century that No. 7 makes 
its appearance ; an auspicious time, truly. Many have been disap- 
pointed at not receiving it earlier, but we trust the value of the book 
will render full compensation for the waiting. It comes just in 
time to aid in the preparation of Easter gifts, giving hints to busy 
brains and fingers during the long winter evenings yet to be, and 
later will prove a useful and pleasant companion through vacation 



PUBLISHERS NOTICE. O 

days, when the wiser among women are making ready their offerings 
for the holiday season — even though this be months away. Just 
here we are tempted to give all our friends the benefit of a sugges- 
tion made by a valued correspondent who has awaited with exem- 
plary patience the appearance of No. 7 : "I was so disappointed 
not to receive the book before going to the mountains, last sum- 
mer," she writes. " My vacation is spent in the preparation of 
gifts, which go into my Christmas-box to await the time for presen- 
tation. In this way I find much enjoyment myself, and cannot help 
believing that the gifts are of far more value to my friends if pro- 
duced in an atmosphere of peace, quiet, and kindly thought, than if 
I must hurry and worry and fret over them at the last moment. I 
always take my Barbour books with me, and have to thank them for 
many beautiful and useful things. In fact, they have solved the 
question, ' What shall I give ? ' for me so completely and so many 
times that I am coming to look on them, one and all, as perfect 
treasure-boxes. The beauty of it is, too, that the articles described 
are so practical and useful, as well as ornamental ; and the descrip- 
tions of them invariably give us some new idea that we may almost 
consider original ! In themselves, with their beautiful print, paper, 
and illustrations, the books make most acceptable gifts for friends 
who are fond of needleworking. After this encomium can there be 
any doubt that I am anxiously awaiting No. 7 ? I do hope to have 
it in season for use during my summer outing." 

Another: " I notice that suggestions are invited. Permit me to 
say that I find the ' Arlington Lace.' on page 33, book No. 3, an 
especially beautiful trimming for albs. The fact that the width 
may be varied as required for different uses is much in its favor." 

Still other correspondents have asked that the books be devoted 
entirely to one or another class of work, but this seems hardly prac- 
ticable. There is no kind of needlework in which the Irish flax 
products may not be used to the greatest advantage ; and while we 
are glad to give extra space and attention to that which seems best 
understood and most popular with the majority, it would be hardly 
fair to devote the entire book of any year to this or any one class. 
Many correspondents write that often a single pattern is worth the 



6 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

price of the book, and this may well be true. A lady who does 
beautiful work with the crochet-needle states that she has made and 
sold nearly one hundred centre-pieces, as illustrated on page 23, 
book No 6. She says : " Made of Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 
25, this piece has the effect of carved ivory. Words cannot do it 
justice." 

A little confusion seems to have arisen in the minds of some ladies 
concerning the terms " linen " and " flax." Linen thread is flax 
thread — made from the fibres of this plant after a wonderful proc- 
ess of manufacture. The story of its evolution from field to finished 
product — to the soft, lustrous flosses used in embroidery, the strong, 
smooth thread employed in lace-making, glove and harness stitch- 
ing, carpet-sewing, book-binding, and every branch of industry in 
which thread or twine is used — is an intensely interesting one which 
cannot be more than hinted at here. The best flax, of long, strong, 
flexible fibre, comes from certain parts of Ireland. It is the use of 
this that gives the name to Barbour's Irish flax thread. Ladies are 
referred to page at the back of this book, which contains facsimiles 
of the spool, ball, carpet-thread and floss labels. 

Our past policy regarding the Prize Needlework Series is to be 
continued. We are glad always to examine work done with Bar- 
bour's Irish flax threads and flosses, and to purchase such articles 
as are deemed suitable for publication. Directions, uniform with 
those printed in our books, must be carefully written out, the price 
plainly marked upon each article, and charges fully prepaid. Pay- 
ment will be made upon acceptance. If not accepted, the article 
will be returned, transportation paid. Original work will receive 
especial attention. If not original, contributors will kindly state 
from what source the design submitted was obtained. The quantity 
of thread required for a yard of lace, or the length of lace made by 
one spool of thread, should be designated, together with the number 
of thread and the size or number of needles. 

We will gladly make sale of work if possible. Kindly state, when 
sending articles to be sold, how long they shall be retained. Re- 
turn charges on work intended merely for sale, and not submitted 
with a view to possible publication, must be paid by the owner. 



publishers' notice. 



We hope during the coming year to establish a salesroom devoted 
to the exhibition and sale of work done with the Irish flax products. 
Due notice of this will be given all desiring it. Realizing how many 
there are all over our country who need to add a little to their own 
personal incomes, and who cannot go from home for this purpose, 
it is our aim to aid ladies in disposing of their handiwork at prices 
which shall be fair to both purchaser and worker. A price-list of 
working patterns used in the prize Needlework Series has been pre- 
pared, and will be sent any lady desiring it, together with a table of 
contents for the entire series. 

In return, we hope that our friends will recommend our books 
and the Irish flax threads to others who may not know of them, and 
that when writing they will inclose names of ladies who are interested 
in lace-work or embroidery, thus aiding us to make new friends con- 
tinually. Rest assured, the favor will be appreciated. 

MARY E. BRADFORD. 



All communications should be addressed, 

THE LINEN THREAD COMPANY, 
Needlework Department, 

48-50 White St., New York. 



EXPLANATION OF TERMS AND ABBREVIATIONS USED 
IN BARBOUR'S, PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 

TERMS USED IN KNITTING. 

K, knit plain. 

O, over; thread over needle, forming an extra stitch. O 2, over 
twice. 

N, narrow ; knit two stitches together. 

P, purl (or seam) ; knit with thread before needle. 

SI, n, and b, slip, narrow, and bind ; slip first stitch, narrow next 
two, and draw slipped stitch over. 

SI and b, slip and bind ; same as si, n, and b, omitting the narrow- 
ing. To cast or bind off, continue the process. 

Stars and parentheses indicate repetition; thus, * o 2, n, repeat 
from * twice, and (o 2, n,) 3 times, mean the same as o 2, n, o 2, n, 
o 2, n. 

TERMS USED IN CROCHETING. 

Ch, chain ; a straight series of loops, each drawn with the hook 
through the one preceding it. 

Sc, single crochet ; hook through work, thread over and draw 
through work and stitch on hook at same time. 

Dc, double crochet ; hook through work, thread over, and draw 
through, over, and draw through two stitches on hook. 

Tc, treble crochet ; over, draw thread through work, over, draw 
through two stitches on hook, over, and draw through remaining 
two. 

Stc, short treble crochet ; like . treble, save that the thread is 
drawn through the three stitches at once. 

Dtc, double treble crochet ; thread over twice before insertion of 
hook in work, then proceed as in treble crochet. 

P, picot; a loop of chain joined by catching in first stitch of 
chain. 

Complete illustrated directions for these stitches are given in 
" No. 1 " of the Prize Series. 



LACE MAKING AND EMBROIDERY 



ALPHABET LACE. 

[Contributed- by Eva M. Stamford, Thwing Terrace, Boston, Mass.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 80, 3-cord, 200-yards 
spools, and steel hook, size 000. 
Ch 67 sts, turn. 

1. Miss 7, 3 tc in next 3 sts, * ch 2, miss 2, a tc in next (form- 
ing a space), repeat from * 14 times, 3 tc in next 3, * miss 2, 3 tc 
each separated by 2 ch in next, repeat from * twice, or as many 
times as desired for depth of border; turn. 

2. Ch 6, dc under 1st 2 ch, ch 3, dc under next 2 ch, ch 3, dc 
under next, ch 3, dc under next, ch 3, dc under next, ch 3, dc under 
next, ch 1, 4 tc in 4 tc, * 2 sp, 4 tc, 9 sp, 4 tc, 2 sp, * tc on tc, ch 
2, tc in 3d of 7 ch ; turn. 

3. Ch 5, tc on tc, 2 sp, * 7 tc, 2 sp, 4 tc, 1 sp, 4 tc, 2 sp, 7 tc, 

2 sp, * 4 tc in 4 tc, 3 tc each separated by 2 ch under each ch of 

3 over middle tc of 1st row; turn. 

4. Like 2d row to *, 2 sp, 34 tc, like 2d row from 2d * to end. 

5. Like 3d to *, 1 sp, 28 tc, 3 sp, like 3d from 2d * to end. 

6. As the beginning and ending of rows are the same as 2d and 
3d, alternating, only directions for letters need be given ; 2 sp, 7 tc, 
3 sp, 4 tc, 2 sp, 10 tc. 

7. 2 sp, 7 tc, 2 sp, 10 tc, 3 sp, 4 tc, 2 sp. 

8. 5 sp, 7 tc, 1 sp, 4 tc, 2 sp, 7 tc. 

9. 2 sp, 10 tc, 10 sp. 

10. 9 sp, 10 tc, 3 sp. 

11. 2 sp, 7 tc, 1 1 sp. 

This completes the letter " F." Make 2 rows of sps between 
letters, and 3 or 4 rows between words. Any scallop or edge may 
be added that is liked, and the alphabet be used in a great variety 



10 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

of combinations. For a "Christmas apron" lace one might work 
the wish "A Merry Christmas," or the name of the one to whom the 
apron is to be presented. For ;a baby's pillow the words, " Sleep, 
Little One, Sleep," surrounded by a vine or other border, would be 
very appropriate, for a sofa-pillow cover, " Rest Here Thy Weary 




Alphabet Lace. 

Head," etc. A very patriotic lady of my acquaintance has made a 
" Remember the Maine " lace for her sideboard scarf. In short, 
variations are endless, and with the word given ladies will find little 
difficulty in producing others. This word is also a suggestion of 
thread to be used, as no one after making lace with Barbour's linen 
(or Irish flax) thread will choose any other. 



PICOT POINT LACE. 

[Contributed by Miss C. A. Ragotzky, 2252 N. Twenty-first Street, Philadelphia, Pa.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 50, 3-cord, 200-yards 
spools (or finer, if desired), and steel hook, size o. A spool makes 
1 5 points, nearly a yard. 



PICOT POINT LACE. 



11 



Ch 28 sts, turn. 

1. A k-st, dc in 7th of ch, 2 k-sts, dc in next 4th st, 1 k-st, (5 
tc in next 4th st) 3 times, 1 k-st, dc in 4th st, 1 k-st, 5 tc in 4th st, 
turn. 

2. Ch 4, 5 tc in 1st tc, 5 tc in last tc, 1 k-st, dc in 1st st of 
next st, ch 3, a tc in each of next 4 tc, keeping last st of each on 
hook and drawing all off together, ch 1, tight, work down side of 
last tc made with sc to 1st st of next sh, and repeat, finishing next 2 
diamonds in same way, working down last tc, 2 k-sts, fasten with a 




Pi cot Point Lace. 



dc close to dc between 2 k-sts of last row, a dc close to same dc on 
other side, 2 k-sts, dc in ch at end of row, turn. 

3. Ch 5, 1 k-st, fasten (as directed in last row; if preferred, 
simply make a dc in centre of dc between k-sts, but this method 
gives it more the appearance of the " Solomon's knot " in macrame), 
2 k-sts, fasten, 2 k-sts, dc in centre of diamond, 1 k-st, 5 tc in 
centre of next diamond, 1 k-st, dc in centre of next, 1 k-st, 5 tc in 



12 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

i st tc of next sh, i -k-st, dc between shs, i k-st, sh (of 5 tc) in top 
of 4 ch of last row, turn. 

4. Ch 4, sh in 1st tc, 1 k-st, dc in last tc, 2 k-sts, dc in 1st tc 
of next sh, 1 k-st, sh in last tc, 1 k-st, finish diamond as directed in 
2d row, (2 k-sts, fasten) 3 times turn. 

5. Ch 5, 1 k-st, fasten, 1 k-st, * sh in dc between next k-sts, re- 
peat from *, 1 k-st, dc in top of diamond, 1 k-st, sh in 1st tc of 
next sh, 1 k-st, dc in last tc, (2 k-sts, fasten) twice, 1 k-st, sh in 
last tc of sh, turn. 

6. Ch 9, dc in 6th (from hook), ch 6, dc in same, ch 6, dc in 
same, 5 tc in 1st tc of sh, 1 k-st in last tc, (2 k-sts, fasten) 3 
times, 1 k-st, sh in last tc of sh, 1 k-st, finish 2 diamonds as in 2d 
row, 2 k-sts, fasten, turn. 

7. Ch 5, 1 k-st, fasten, 1 k-st, (sh in top of diamond) twice, 
1 k-st, dc in 1st tc of next sh, 1 k-st, sh in last tc, 1 k-st, fasten, 
(2 k-sts, fasten) twice, 1 k-st, sh in 1st tc of last sh, turn. 

8. Sc in each tc of sh, ch 4, sh in same tc, 1 k-st, fasten, 2 k-sts, 
fasten, 1 k-st, sh in 1st tc of next sh, 1 k-st, dc in last tc, 2 k-sts, 
finish 2 diamonds as directed in 2d row, 2 k-sts, fasten in ch at end, 
turn. 

9. Ch 5, 1 k-st, fasten, (2 k-sts, dc in top of diamond) twice, 
1 k-st, sh in dc between next 2 k-sts, 1 k-st, dc in 1st tc of sh 
following, 1 k-st, sh in last tc, 1 k-st, fasten, 1 k-st, sh in 1st tc of 
sh, turn. 

10. Sc in each tc, ch 4, sh in same tc, sh in 1st tc of next sh, 
1 k-st, dc in last tc of sh below, 2 k-sts, finish diamond, (2 k-sts, 
fasten) 3 times, turn. 

A very rich and handsome design for finishing a sideboard scarf. 
In finer flax thread it may be used for many purposes. 



IVY LACE. 

[Contributed by Mrs. M. M. Mott, So Washington Street, Morristown, N.J.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 60, 3-cord, 200-yards 
spools, and steel hook, size o. 



IVY LACE, 



13 



Ch 70 st ; turn. 

1. Miss 7, 4 tc in 4 st, * ch 2, miss 2, a tc in next, repeat from 
* 13 times, forming 14 spaces, 3 tc in next 3 st, ch 2, miss 2, a tc 
in next, * 2 tc separated by 2 ch in next st, miss 2, repeat from last * 
to form 4 loops in ail ; turn. 




Iw Lace. 



2. Ch 3, * 3 tc, i ch and 1 tc under 2 ch, repeat 3 times, tc in 
tc, ch 2, 4 tc in 4 tc, * ch 2, tc in next tc, repeat 4 times, 12 tc in 
next 12 st, ch 2, miss 2, 13 tc in next 13 st, ch 2, miss 2, 4 tc on 

4 tc, ch 2, miss 2, tc in next; turn. 

3. Ch 5, 4 tc on 4 tc, ch 2, miss 2, 13 tc in next 13 st, * ch 2, 
miss 2, 13 tc in next 13 st, ch 2, tc on tc, repeat 3 times, 3 tc on 
next 3 tc, * ch 2, tc on tc, 2 tc separated by 2 ch under each 1 ch 
of last row ; turn. 

4. Like 2d row to 2d * ; 4 sp (2 tc separated by 2 ch), 13 tc 
in 13 tc, 1 sp, 13 tc in 13 tc, 1 sp, 4 tc in 4 tc, ch 2, tc in 3d st of 

5 ch; turn. 

5. Ch 5, 4 tc in 4 tc, 2 sp, 10 tc on last 10 of 13 tc, 1 sp, 10 tc 

/ 



14 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

on 10 tc, i sp, 7 tc (in last of 13 tc, and on 2 sp following), 2 sp, 
4 tc on 4 tc, finish like 3d row from 2d *. 

6. Like 2d row to 2d * ; 1 sp, 13 tc, 3 sp, 4 tc, 5 sp, 4 tc, ch 2, 
and tc in 3d of 5 ch • turn. The tc helping to form last sp is 
counted. 

7. Ch 5, 4 tc in 4 tc, 2 sp, 10 tc, 1 sp, 4 tc, 2 sp, 13 tc, 1 sp, 4 
tc ; like 3d row from 2d *. 

8. Like 2d row to 2d * ; 2 sp, 10 tc, 1 sp, 4 tc, 2 sp, 13 tc, 1 
sp, 4 tc, ch 2, tc in 3d of 5 ch ; turn. 

9. Ch 5, 4 tc in 4 tc, 1 sp, 13 tc, 3 sp, 4 tc, 5 sp, 4 tc ; like 3d 
row from 2d *. 

10. Like 2d row to 2d * ; 2 sp, 10 tc, 1 sp, 10 tc, 1 sp, 7 tc, 2 
sp, 4 tc, ch 2, tc in 3d of 5 ch ; turn. 

11. Ch 5, 4 tc, 4 sp, 13 tc, 1 sp, 13 tc, 1 sp, 4 tc ; like 3d row 
from 2d *. 

12. Like 2d row to 2d * ; 1 sp, 13 tc, 1 sp, 13 tc, 4 sp, 4 tc, ch 
5, tc in 3d of 5 ch ; turn. 

13. Ch s, 4 tc, 5 sp, 7 tc, 3 sp, 7 tc, 2 sp, 4 tc; like 3d row 
from 2d *. 

14. Like 2d row to 2d * ; 14 sp, 4 tc, ch 2, tc in 3d of 5 ch : 
turn. Repeat from 2d row. This trimming will be found especially 
suitable for pillow-slips, aprons, etc., in the finer thread, while in No. 
40 or No. 50 of Barbour's Irish flax thread, either white, gray, or ecru 
it is very handsome for finishing the ends of sideboard or dresser 
scarfs. The insertion is made by leaving off the lower edge of shs. 



LACE FOR SIDEBOARD SCARF. 

[Contributed by Mrs. A. L. Wertman, Tannersville, Pa.] 

Materials : No. 30 Barbour's Irish flax thread, and steel hook, 
size o. 

The principal parts of this handsome design are made up of a 
new and original stitch, first appearing, with complete directions for 
working it, in Barbour's Prize Needlework Series, No. 6. It is 
called the spoke, or Russian stitch, as it resembles some Russian 
work. Ch 7, join. 



LACE FOR SIDEBOARD SCARF. 



15 



i. Ch io, * take a loop around the ch, thread over, draw 
through, repeat from * 19 times, keeping all on hook, take a loop 
through ring, thread over, draw through all loops on hook, drawing 
tight enough to curve the stitch ; let this loop on the needle remain 
idle ; that is, do not work through it until called for. With the 
hook draw a loop through ring, ch 5, draw last ch through idle loop 
on hook, ch 5, and repeat from *, making 10 loops on each 5 ch. 
Work 8 curved spokes as described, joining last to first at back. 

2. Draw thread to top of spoke from joining (if preferred, the 
thread may be cut and joined in), ch 6, * 4 dtc with 3 ch between 
in top of next spoke (about 3 loops from the end), ch 3, tc in next 
spoke, ch 3, repeat from * 3 times, and join to 3d of 6 ch. 




Lace for Sideboard Scarf. 



3> 4> 5> 6. Dc in each st, with 3 dc in each corner st; turn at 
end of row, forming ribs, as described for table-mats in No. 5. As 
all are doubtless familiar with the method, it is not necessary to 
describe it. 

7. Tc separated by 2 ch all around, with 3 tc in corners. 

8. Ch 7, 12 loops on ch, catch in space and draw through, 
working exactly as described for centre, except that there are 4 ch 
for lower part and 3 for upper part of spokes, with 5 loops on the 3 



16 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

ch, and 7 on the 5 ; fasten in the spaces, making 1 or 2 dc to suit 
fulness. A little practice is all that is required, as the work is very 
simple. 

g. The small wheels between the squares are made like centre of 
the latter. Join squares corner to corner by 3 spokes, when working, 
or with needle and thread, as preferred. Begin at 4th spoke on 
corner of 1st square, fasten in, ch 6, fasten in spoke of small wheel, 
ch 6, miss 1 spoke of square, fasten, ch 6, fasten in next spoke of 
wheel, ch 6, miss 1 spoke of square, fasten in next, ch 12, miss 1 
spoke, fasten in next, * ch 5, fasten in next, 4 times, work opposite 
side of square like first, taking 2d wheel, ch 6, fasten in correspond- 
ing spoke of next square, and repeat to length of lace. 

10. Fasten in top of 1st upper spoke of wheel, ch 5, fasten in 
next, ch 5, thread over 5 times, a dtc under 12 ch, catch in top 
of 3d spoke of wheel, work off remaining st, ch 5, a dtc under same 
12 ch, ch 5, tc under 5 ch, ch 4, dc under next, ch 4, dc under 
next, ch 4, dc under next, ch 4, tc under next, ch 5, thread over 5 
times, dtc in 1st unoccupied spoke of next wheel, catch in centre 
of 12 ch, work off remaining st, ch 5, and repeat from first of row. 

11. Tc, with 2 ch between. 

12. 13. Dc in each st. 

14. Tc in 1st st, * ch 3, tc in top of tc just made, miss 2 st, tc 
in next, and repeat. 

The squares may be used for tidies or joined for any purpose 
desired. The lace would be beautiful for finishing a centre-piece, 
as a corner may be nicely turned, and for this purpose should be 
made of No. 50 Barbour's Irish flax thread. 



FLORIDA SHELL LACE, FOR HANDKERCHIEF. 

[Contributed by Satie J. Campin, Orlando, Florida.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax lace thread, No. 250, 2 -cord, 200- 
yards spools, steel hook size 000, or the finest you can obtain, a 
yard of Honiton insertion, and 8-inch square of fine linen lawn. 
Any size desired may be used for the centre, but the smaller the 



FLORIDA SHELL LACE, 



17 



daintier. The lace edge, complete, is 3 inches wide, but may be 
narrower if preferred. 




Florida Shell Lace, for Handkerchief. 



Draw 6 threads one inch from edge of lawn, all around, turn hem 
neatly and hemstitch. Width of hem may, of course, be left to one's 
own taste. Sew the insertion around this square, fulling at the 
corners. Begin lace by drawing thread through outer edge of in- 
sertion and fastening well. The 1st row of shs is made around 



18 harbour's prize needle-work series. 

the insertion about J^ mcn a P art > no exact rule can be given for 
this, as there are no picots on the edge. Simply make the shs 
even, and not too full. Fasten in near a corner : 

i. Ch 3, 3 tc in same place,* ch i, miss a space, sh of 6 
dtc each separated by i ch, ch i, miss a space, smaller sh of 4 
tc, and repeat from *. In the large shells draw the middle 
stitches up longer ; all should be drawn out longer than ordinarily 
and worked quite loose, to give the fluffy, dainty appearance. The 
shells should be made a trifle nearer together at the corners. Also 
arrange to have them come out even, so that 2 large or 2 small ones 
will not come together. This can easily be done by a little calcula- 
tion when near the end. Join last 1 ch to top of 1st 3 ch. 

2. Make 2 sc along top of 1st small sh, fastening between 2 tc, 
* ch 6, fasten between 1st and 2d dtc, of large sh, (ch 5, fasten 
between next 2,) 4 times, ch 6, fasten between 2d and 3d tc of 
small sh, and repeat from *, fastening last 6 ch where 1st started. 

3. Work back in sc to middle of 6 ch just made, * ch 5, 
fasten in middle of next 6 ch, ch 6, fasten in 2d loop of 5 ch, ch 
5, fasten in next loop, ch 6, fasten in middle of 6 ch following, and 
repeat from *, joining where started. 

This completes the sh. Repeat from 1st row, beginning with a 
single under 5 ch, and ch 3 for 1st tc. Make shs in the loop 
exactly over shs of previous row. Three rows constitute a sh, and 
as many shs may be made as desired for the border. The sample 
has 6, requiring i T / 2 spools of thread. I cannot speak too highly 
of the lace thread for work of this nature ; it is so silken, yet crisp 
and dainty. Barbour's Irish flax I have found superior to all thread 
for lace-work, and am sure ladies will " take no other" after giving 
this a trial. 



TABLE OR TOILET MATS. 

[Contributed by Miss Anna Harris, 1103 Corning- Street, Red Oak, Iowa.] 

Materials : Two and one-half spools of Barbour's Irish flax thread, 
No. 40, white, 3-cord, 200-yards spools, crochet hook size 1, and 
Y± yard of heavy butcher's linen, for centres. 



TABLE OR TOILET MATS. 



19 



First mark the centres on the linen, of any shape and size desired 
The set of which one is illustrated has two oval mats, one large 
round mat, and two small round ones. The largest oval centre is 
7 X 4% inches, the smaller is 6 x 4 inches ; the large round centre 
is 6 inches in diameter, and the smaller ones 4% inches. First 
buttonhole the edges all around, over the pencil line, —and it is a' 
good plan to stitch around this, to make a firmer edge, — using 2 
short and 1 long stitch. For the border : 




Table or Toilet Mats. 



1. Fasten in, ch 3, and make a tc in every buttonhole stitch all 
around, joining to top of 3 ch by a single. 

2. Ch 4, * miss 1, a tc in next, ch 1, repeat from * all around 
joining to 3d of 4 ch. 

3- Ch 8, turn, a dc in each stitch of ch, * ch 1, turn, a dc in 



20 harbour's prize needle-work series. 

each of 8 dc, repeat from * 5 times, forming a solid square, miss 
2 to of last row, a triple tc (thread over 3 times) in next, ch 8, miss 
2 tc, a sc in next, ch 6, a tc in 3d stitch of 8 ch, ch 2, a tc in 6th 
stitch, ch 2, a tc in top of .triple tc, ch 6, turn, tc in tc, in each of 2 
ch and in next tc ch 2, tc in 3d of 6 ch, ch 6, turn, tc in tc, ch 2, 
miss 2, tc in tc, ch 2, miss 2, tc in 3d of 6 ch, turn, and work along 
edge of square with sc to lower corner, miss 2 tc below, a triple tc 
in next, and repeat from beginning of row, alternating solid and open 
squares, and joining corner of last to 1st by 1 sc. 

4. Ch 5, * a dtc in 2d row of square, ch 2, a tc in 5th row, ch 
2, 2 tc separated by 2 ch in corner, ch 2, miss 3, a tc, ch 2, miss 3, 
a dtc, a triple tc in top of triple tc below, work around open square 
in same way, and repeat from * around mat, joining last dtc to top 
of 5 ch. 

5. Catch back with a dc under 2 ch last made, * ch 5, a dc 
under 1st 2 ch of next square, ch 3, a dc under next 2 ch, ch 1, a 
tc under next 2 ch, (ch 7, fasten back in 1st stitch to form a picot, 
ch 1, a dtc under same 2 ch) 4 times, p, ch 1, a double under 
2 ch, ch 3, a dc under next 2 ch, and repeat from beginning of row. 
If preferred, the 1st and last of each scallop may be trebles. 

If a heavy linen duck is used these make very durable table-mats. 
A coarser number of thread may be used, if preferred, but No. 40 
makes a lovely, rich, and heavy border in this pattern. 



SQUARE FOR BEDSPREAD. 

[Contributed by Estelle Ball, Talmage, Kansas.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 30, 3-cord, 200-yards 
spools, and steel hook, size 1. 

1. Wind thread 10 times around a large lead-pencil, slip off and 
fasten with 1 double; ch 4, 7 dtc in ring, * ch 7, 8 dtc in ring, 
repeat from * twice, ch 7 and join to top of 4 ch. 

2. Ch 3, 1 tc in every st all around, with 3 in corners, to widen ; 
join to top of 3 ch. 

3. Ch 5, a tc in same place, miss 2, 2 tc separated by 3 ch in 



SQUARE FOR BEDSPREAD. 



21 



next, repeat around block, at the corners making 3 tc in a st, with 
3 ch between each. Join to 3d of 5 ch. 

4. Like 3d row, making sh in sh, same at corners. 

5. Sh in sh, 5 tc in next sh, 3 shs, 5 dtc between shs at corner, 
3 shs, 5 tc, and so continue. 

6. Ch 3, 4 tc in sh, * ch 4, 5 tc in next sh, sh in each of next 2 
shs, 8 tc separated by 5 ch at corner (put 1 tc on last tc of sh, 3 




Square for Bedspread. 

on dtc, ch 5, a tc in same place as last, 2 on dtc, 1 on tc), 2 shs 
in shs, 5 tc in next sh, and repeat from * all around, joining to top of 
3 ch. 

7. Catch back in previous sh, ch 3, 4 tc in same sh, * ch 5, a 
tc under 4 ch, ch 5,5 tc in next sh, sh in next, 4 tc on 4 tc, ch 5, 
1 tc in 3d st of 5 ch, ch 5, 4 tc in last 4 tc, missing 1st (counting 
tc of sh), sh in sh, 5 tc in next sh, and repeat around, joining to 
top of 3 ch. 



22 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

8. Catch back as before, ch 3, 4 tc, * ch 5, 1 tc under next ch, 
ch 5, a tc under next, ch 5, 5 tc in next sh, miss 1 tc, 3 tc in next 
3, ch 5, 5 tc in tc at corner, ch 5, miss 1 tc, 3 tc in next 3, 5 tc in 
sh, and repeat from *, joining to top of 3 ch. 

9. Ch 8, * a tc under 5 ch, ch 5, 5 tc under next 5 ch, ch 5, a 
tc under next, ch 5, miss 3 tc, 4 tc in next 4, ch 5,3 tc in 3 tc at 
corner, ch 5, 1 tc in same tc as last, 2 in next 2, ch 5, miss 1 tc, 4 
tc in next 4, ch 5, and repeat from *, joining to 3d of 8 ch. 

10. Catch back in preceding tc, ch 7, * a tc under 5 ch, ch 4, 5 
tc under next 5 ch, ch 4, 5 tc under next 5 ch, ch 4, a tc under 
next, ch 4, miss a tc, 2 tc in next 2, ch 5, 3 tc in 3 tc, ch 5, a tc in 
centre of 5 ch, ch 5, 3 tc on tc, ch 5,2 tc in centre of 4 tc, ch 4, 
and repeat from *, joining to 3d of 7 ch. 

11. Ch 7, * 5 tc under next ch, ch 5, a tc under next, ch 5, 5 
tc under next, ch 4, a tc in tc, ch 5, 3 tc in 3 tc, ch 5, 2 tc separated 
by 5 ch in tc at corner, ch 5, 3 tc in tc, ch 5, tc on 2d tc, ch 4, and 
repeat from *, joining to 3d of 7 ch. 

12. Ch 3, a tc in every st all around, with 5 in corner st, to 
widen ; join to top of 3 ch. 

This completes the block. Join as follows : Ch 4, turn ; shell of 
3 tc, 2 ch, 1 tc in 1st st of ch, ch 2, fasten at corner of block, turn; 
shell under 2 ch in shell just made, ch 2, fasten to another block, and 
repeat. This design is very pretty for tidies. The connection may 
be of chains, thus : Fasten in 1st block, ch 10, fasten in 2d block, a 
single in next 3 tc, ch 10, fasten in 1st block, and so on. The 4th 
ch may be caught under preceding 2, thus : Ch 5, a sc under 2d 
ch below, ch 5, fasten in opposite block. Run ribbon in the spaces, 
over the single chains and under the triple ones. If desired, an 
extra row of dtc may be added to each block, separating each by 
2 ch, the blocks joined by overseaming neatly, and narrow red and 
blue ribbon alternately run in the spaces. In these "patriotic" 
days, this suggestion will find favor. There is much pleasure in 
evolving new ideas, no less in the use of the linen threads for lace- 
work of any description, they are so rich and satisfactory in every 
way. 



PLATE DOILY. 



23 



PLATE DOILY. 

[Contributed by Emma Pettit, Grimsby, Ontario, Can.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, ecru, No. ioo, 3-cord, 200- 
yards spools, and steel hook, size 000. 

Ch 12, join. 

1. Begin each row with 3 ch for a tc, 36 tc in ring, join (always) 
to third stitch of chain. 




Plate Doily. 



2. A tc in every other stitch, 2 ch between. 

3. 2 tc in 1 tc, 3 ch between. 

4> 5> 6, 7, 8. Same as 3d row, increasing 1 tc each row. In 
8th row there will be 7 tc on 6 tc, with 3 ch between. 



24 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

g. 4 tc on 4 tc, ch i, 4 tc on 4 tc, ch 3, repeat. 

10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17. Same as 9th row, increasing the 
ch between groups of 4 tc 1 stitch each row. The 17 th row has 
10 ch. 

18. 4 tc in tc, ch 4, 2 tc in 5th and 6th of 10 ch, ch 4, 4 tc on tc, 
ch 3, repeat. 

19. 4 tc on tc, ch 4, miss 3, 4 tc, ch 4, miss 3, 4 tc, ch 3, and 
repeat. 

20. Missing 1st of 4 tc, 4 tc in 4 sts, ch 4, 2 tc in centre 
of 4 tc, ch 4, miss 4, 4 tc, ch 6 ; repeat. 

21. 4 tc (missing 1st), ch 8, 4 tc (1st in ch, 3 in tc of last 
row), ch 3, 1 tc, ch 5, 1 tc, ch 3, all under 6 ch, ch 3, and repeat. 

22. 4 tc (as in 21st row), ch 6, 4 tc, ch 3, 1 tc under 3 ch, 
ch 3, 1 tc under next loop, ch 5, 1 tc in same place, ch 3, 1 tc 
under 3 ch, ch 3 ; repeat. 

23. 24. Like 2 2d row, decreasing ch in diamond by 2 sts each 
row, and increasing the loops, making 3 ch and 1 tc twice more 
every row. 

25. 8 tc over 3 tc, 2 ch and 3 tc, 11 loops as directed, and 
repeat. 

26. 4 tc in centre of 8 tc, missing 1st and last 2, ch 7, catch 
back into 5 th from hook to form a p, ch 2, a tc under 3 ch, repeat in 
every loop, with 2 in centre loop, and continue around. 

Made of coarser thread, No. 40 or No. 50 Barbour's Irish flax, 
this design makes a very handsome and serviceable cover for a piano 
stool, or tidy. 



GENTLEMEN'S SUSPENDERS. 

[Contributed by Miss Anna Fitch, New Haven, Conn.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 25, 3-cord, 200-yards 
spools, and steel hook, size 2, or large enough to carry the thread 
smoothly, with 2 skeins Ulster rope linen or etching flax, blue, or 
any desired color. Two spools of thread are required. An afghan 
hook is best, but for so narrow a strip an ordinary hook may be 
used. 



GENTLEMEN S SUSPENDERS. 



25 



Ch 19 sts, turn. 

1. Take up and draw thread through each consecutive st of ch, 
keeping all on the hook. 

2. Thread over, draw through a st, * over, draw through 2 sts, 
and repeat until all are worked off. Repeat these 2 rows to the 




Gentlemen's Suspenders. 



length of 27 inches, in the 3d row drawing up the sts under each 
little upright loop appearing on the surface of the work. This is 
the plain afghan or tricot st. 

Having made 2 strips of length designated, proceed to embroider 
them in cross-stitch, or as desired. Cross-stitching is easily done 
on the afghan work. Use the rope linen if a simple design is chosen, 
or the etching flax if this is more elaborate. It is best to line the 
bands with a broad elastic slightly narrower than the work, felling 
this on with a finer linen thread firmly but easily, *o allow the band 



26 



to give a little with the elastic when worn, and not so closely that it 
may not be removed if necessary to launder the crocheted bands. 
For all such purposes linen thread is very suitable, having the silken 
lustre, and refusing to grow rough with service. 



DOILY, IN ROLL AND KNOT STITCH. 

[Contributed by Annie Williams, Steubenville, O.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax crochet and lace thread, in balls, 
or 3-cord, 200-yards spools, No. 40, steel hook, size 1, and circle of 
linen 6 inches in diameter. 

Buttonhole around linen, using long and short st, again with short 
st. Fold linen three times, dividing it into eight sections. Cut a 
circle an inch in diameter and half an inch from edge from each sec- 
tion, buttonhole around with long and short st, and fill in with 
loose buttonhole st, or any desired. Divide the circumference of 
the linen into sections of three- fourths and half an inch alternately; 
this will given 16 of each. 

1. Fasten in at beginning of half-inch space, make 6 roll-st of 
24 overs each, 2 k-st, miss three-fourths inch, and repeat. Join 
last k-st to top of 1st roll, a dc between 1st and 2d roll-st, dc be- 
tween 2d and 3d. 

2. A roll-st in same place, 2 roll-st between 3d and 4th, 1 be- 
tween 4th and 5 th, 2 k-st, dc in dc between k-st of last row, 2 k-st, 
4 roll-st in centre of 6 roll-st, as before, repeat around, and join. 

3. 2 roll-st in centre of 4 roll-st, * 2 k-st, dc in dc of last row, 
repeat twice, and repeat from beginning of row. 

4. A roll-st in centre of 2 roll-st, * 2 k-st, fasten, repeat 4 times, 
then repeat row, fastening in top of roll-st. 

5. 10 roll-st in top of roll-st, fasten in dc between next k-st, * 2 
k-st, fasten in next dc, repeat twice, then repeat row, catching in 
top of 1st roll-st. 

6. A dc between 1st and 2d roll-st, * 2 k-st, dc between next 2, 
repeat 7 times, 1 k-st, fasten in next k (dc between k-st), 2 k-st, 



DOILY, IN ROLL AND KNOT STITCH. 'I i 

fasten in next, 2 k-st, fasten in next, 1 k-st, and repeat row, joining 
last k-st where started. 

7. A dc in next k, ch 3, tc in same, ch 2, 2 tc in same, * sh of 2 
tc, 2 ch and 2 tc in next k, repeat 6 times, dc in next k, 2 k-st, 
fasten in next, sh in next, and repeat from *. 

8. Sh of 7 tc under 2 ch in sh of last row, repeat 7 times, fasten 
in k, repeat row all around. 




Doily in Roll and Knot Stitch. 



A very handsome piece for any purpose required, especially for 
the top of small polished table, or taboret. The roll-st is accurately 
described in No. 4 Book, page 33. 



28 barbour's prize needle-work series. 



HEXAGON DOILY. 

[Contributed by Mrs. Sarah Hale, Romulus, Mich.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 80, 3 -cord, 200-yards 
spools, and steel hook, size 000. 

i. Ch 15, tc in 1st st, * ch 10, tc in same st, repeat 3 times, ch 5, 
dtc in 5th st of 15 ch. 

2. Ch 8 7 and sc in top of ch loop ; repeat. 

3. Ch 3 for 1st tc, 9 tc under 1st 8 ch, 10 tc under each of 5 
loops, making 2 ch between each group ; join to top of 3 ch. 

4. Ch 3, tc in tc, all around, with 1 tc, 2 ch, and 1 tc under 2 ch 
of last row ; join to top of 3 ch. 

5. 6, 7. Like 4th, with 2 tc, ch 2, and 2 tc under 2 ch at corners. 

8. Ch 4, miss 1, * tc in next, ch 3, miss 1, repeat around, with 1 
tc, 2 ch, and 1 tc under ch at corners ; join. 

9. Ch 3, tc in ch, tc in tc, repeat around, with 1 tc, 2 ch, and 1 
tc in corner ch ; join. This completes the centre, which may be 
made as much larger as desired. 

Border : 1. Dc in 4 tc, ch 9, * sc in 5th st of 9 ch, ch 4, dc to 
corner, 1 dc, 2 ch, and 1 dc under corner ch, 15 dc in next 15 tc, 
ch 9, and repeat. 

2. Ch 5, dc in loop of last row, ch 5, turn work, sl-st in last dc 
made, * ch 9, dc in loop, ch 5, sl-st in 5th st of 9 ch, repeat from * 
6 times, miss 4 dc, dc in dc with 1 dc, 2 ch, and 1 dc in corner ch, 
9 dc down other side, and repeat row. 

3. 5 dc in each ch between loops, dc in dc with 1 dc, 2 ch, and 
1 dc at corners. 

4. Dc around loops, making 3 dc in 3d st between 4th and 5 th 
loops, ch 7, 4 tc each separated by 2 ch under corner ch, ch 7, and 
repeat. 

5. Miss 1 dc, dc in dc around, with 3 dc in 2d of 3 dc at top, 
miss last dc, ch 5, 2 tc, ch 2 and 2 tc under 1st 2 ch, 2 tc, ch 2, 2 
tc, ch 2, 2 tc, ch 2, 2 tc, all under next loop, 2 tc, ch 2, 2 tc, under 
next loop, ch 5, and repeat. 



HEXAGON DOILY. 



29 



6. Miss i dc, work around point as before, miss last dc, ch 3, 3 
tc, 2 ch and 3 tc under each 2 ch of last row, ch 3, and repeat. 

7. Miss 3 dc, work around loop as before, miss 3 dc, sh of 3 tc, 
2 ch and 3 tc in 1st 2 shs, sh of 8 tc in next, sh of 3 tc, 2 ch and 3 
tc in each of next 2, and repeat. 




Hexagon Doily. 



8. Ch 3, miss 1, fasten in next st ; repeat all around. 

This border is very effective for table-mats, making the centre of 
ribbed work, as described in No. 5 Book, either hexagonal or oblong, 
as liked. For this purpose use No. 25 Barbour's Irish flax thread, 
Or the border may be added to a linen centre, forxloily. Enlarged, 
the design makes a beautiful cover for a little hexagonal table. 



30 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 



FANCY WORK-BAG. 

[Contributed by Merna Lang, 79 West Street, Hillsdale, Mich.] 

Materials : Two spools Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 35, 3 -cord, 
200-yards spools, steel hook, size 1, ^ yard silk 19 inches wide, 3 
yards ribbon. 

Ch 5, join. 

1. 12 stc in ring. 

2. 2 stc in each st of 
last row. 

3. Widen every 5th st, 
making stc in stc. The 
bottom of the bag has 25 
rows. Widen in 22 rows 
until you have 180 st ; in 
the last 3 rows do not 
widen at all. 

The leaves are the same 
as in the " Rose and Leaf 
Doily," in No. 4, and the 
centre-piece in No. 6. Ch 
14, turn; miss 2, 11 dc in 
11 st, 3 in 12th, 10 down 
other side of ch, turn ; 
ch 1, miss 1 dc, 11 dc in 
11 dc, 3 in next, 10 in 
next 10, turn. Alternate 
until you have 6 ridges. 
Join 1st row to bottom of 
bag by centre st of 3 in 
last row of leaf; before 
making last row of next 
leaf join to 1st leaf with 
sl-st, work to centre of 
leaf, miss n st of bottom 
mat, join to next, and finish leaf. In each row are 15 leaves, the 2d 




Fancy Work-bag. 



child's bonnet. 31 

and 3d rows being joined to tips of leaves in previous row instead 
of bottom of bag. The space between leaves is filled with crossed 
threads, with a wheel woven around them. Finish top of bag with 
2^ inch hem and space for draw-strings of the ribbon, pull the 
crocheted bag on over it, and catch the tip of each leaf in upper 
row to the silk bag, just below the draw-strings. It is very useful, 
handsome, and serviceable, as, when soiled, the cover may be re- 
moved, laundered, and returned to place. 



CHILD'S BONNET. 

[Contributed by Miss Estella Ball, Talmage, Kansas.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 70, 3-cord, 200-yards 
spools, either white or ecru, and steel hook, size 00. One spool 
will be sufficient for the bonnet. If preferred, a coarser number 
may be chosen. 

Wind thread 20 times around a lead-pencil, and work over with 
25 dc. 

1. Ch 3, tc in back of each st, widening by making 2 tc in 1 st 
8 times. Join to top of 3 ch. 

2. Ch 3 for a tc, 4 tc in 4 tc, * 2 k-st (for a knot-st draw out 
loop on needle about % inch long, draw thread through this loop, 
put needle beween this thread and loop, draw thread through, take 
up thread and draw through 2 st on hook; repeat for each k-st), 
5 tc, the 1st in same place at last, and repeat. 

3. 4 tc in 5 tc, leaving last loop on hook each time and drawing 
thread through all at once, ch 1, 1 k-st, dc in top of 2 k-st of last 
row, 1 k-st ; repeat. 

4. 2 k-st, dc in top of 4 tc ; repeat. 

5. 2 k-st, dc in dc between 2 k-st of last row; repeat. 

6. Ch 6, dc in dc between 2 k-st ; repeat. 

7. Tc in each ch, 2 tc in each dc. 

8. Ch 10, * miss 6, dc in next st, turn ; ch 3, 5 tc in 5 ch, turn ; 
ch 3, 5 tc m 5 tc, ch 5 ; repeat. Fasten to 1st 5 st of 10 ch at end 
of rows, in last block. 



32 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES, 



9. Ch 8, dc in corner of block ; repeat. 

10. Like 7th row. 

11. Ch 5, miss 3, dc in next st ; repeat. 

12. Sh of 5 tc in dc between loops of ch, dc in loop, ch 5, dc in 
next loop ; repeat. 




Child's Bonnet. 



13 

16 

18 
19 



Sh in each ch, 1 dc in each loop and top of sh alternately. 

Like 1 2th row, with loop over the sh in 12th row. 

Like 13 th row. 

Like 1 2 th row. 

Ch 4, dc in top of sh, ch 4, dc in loop ; repeat. 

Tc in each st. 

2 k-st, miss 3, dc in next \ repeat. 



infant's bonnet. 33 

20, 21, 22. 2 k-st, dc in dc, between k-st of last row. 

23. Ch 4, dc in dc ; repeat. 

24. Tc in each st. 

25. Draw thread out 5/% inch, 5 tc in same place, drawing 
thread out each time, ch 1, miss 5, 5 tc as before in next st, 
repeat to within 5 inches of beginning of row, break thread, and 
fasten in at other end. 

26. Sh of 3 tc, 1 ch and 3 tc in 3d of 5 tc (these not drawn 
out), dc under 1 ch ; repeat across; turn. 

27. Ch 4, dc under 1 ch ; repeat; turn. 

28. Tc in each st ; turn. 

29. Ch 5, miss 4, dc in next; repeat; turn. 

30. Like 1 2th row. 

31. Like 13th row. 

32. Like 14th row. 

33. Like 1 8th row. Continue the chain along the neck, fasten- 
ing in ends of previous rows, as convenient, till the row of tc before 
the drawn-out tc is reached ; join to this neatly, turn, make 3 dc in 
tc, then tc in each st, widening at corners, around to opposite side ; 
work this in the same way ; there should be a row of tc entirely 
around the bonnet. 

34. 35, 36, 37. 2 k-st, miss 2, dc in next, and repeat; after the 
1st, make dc in dc between k-st of previous row. The last row has 
a picot edge, thus : 1 k-st, ch 5, dc in dc just made, k-st, dc in dc 
between k-st of last row, and repeat. 

Make ties of ribbon or hemstitched mull, as preferred. A lining 
may be crocheted of plain tc, or the bonnet lined with any desired 
fabric. The Irish flax thread is admirable for such articles, as it has 
a beautiful lustre and launders so well. 



INFANT'S BONNET. 

[Contributed by Mrs. F. P. Bernard, "Warren, Minn.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread No. 60, 3 -cord, 200-yards 
spools, and steel hook, size 00. To finish prettily, the bonnet should 
be lined with China silk, with ties of the same and, if desired, a bow 



34 



BARBOUR S PRIZE XEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 



of the silk on top of bonnet. This, however, may be left to the 
taste of the worker. A spool of thread will be sufficient. 
Ch 31. 

1. Miss 3. tc in each of 28 st ; turn. 

2. Ch 5, miss 1 tc. dc in next, repeat across ; turn. 

3. Ch 5, 2 dc in 5 ch oi last row: repeat. Continue like $d 
row until there are 21 rows of loops. 




Infant's Bonnet. 



22, 23. Draw thread up to centre of last loop, fasten with sc 
continue as before. 

24, 25. -Like 3d row. 
26, 27. Like 2 2d row. 
28. Like 3d. 



infant's bonnet. 35 

29, 30. Like 2 2d row. Fasten and cut thread, having finished 
the crown. 

31. Fasten in at base of crown, make 3 tc in side of tc, sh of 5 
tc in 2d loop, * fasten with dc in next loop, sh in next, repeat 
around, finish with 3 tc in tc. 

32. 3 tc in 3 tc, ch 3, sc in centre of sh, ch 3, tc in st between 
shs, repeat from * to end, finishing with 3 tc in 3 tc. This is done 
in each row, so need not be mentioned. 

33. Ch 3 (after the 3 tc), * fasten in centre of sh, sh in tc 
between shs, repeat from * to end. 

34. 35. Shs between shs, each fastened to centre of following sh 
of last row. 

36. Ch 5, sc in centre of sh ; repeat. 



37 

38 

39 
40 

42 

43 



Tc in each st. 

Ch 6, miss 2 tc, sc in next ; repeat. 
Ch 5, 2 dc in 6 ch, and repeat. 
Ch 3, sc in centre of 5 ch ; repeat. 
Tc in each st. 

Ch 5, miss 2, sc in next ; repeat. 

Make 4 loops of 5 ch, fastening in 5 ch of last row, sh of 3 
tc between next 2 loops, fasten in centre of next loop, and repeat. 

44. Sh each side of sh in last row, with loops between ; repeat. 

45, 46, 47. Like 44th row, increasing a sh each row, and 
decreasing a loop. 

48, 49, 50, 51. Decrease a sh each row, increasing loops. 

52. Loops of 5 ch between loops of last row, fastening every 5th 
ch to centre of sh. 

53. Dtc under 5 ch, ch 4, sc in top of- dtc ; repeat 9 times for 
each scallop, working all around. 

By using general directions this pattern may be varied as liked. 
The Irish flax thread has the appearance of silk and does not grow 
fuzzy or yellow w T hen washed. 



36 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 



TUMBLER OR BONBON DOILY. 

[Contributed by Miss Alice L. Brown, Putney, Vt.] 

Materials : a spool of Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. ioo, white, 
3-cord, 200-yards spools, crochet hook, size oo, and 4-inch square 
of linen. 

Ch 6, join. 




Tumbler or Bonbon Doily. 



i. Ch 6, triple tc in loop, * ch 2, triple tc in loop, repeat from * 7 
times, making 10 spokes in all, ch 10, sc in 5th st of to ch, ch 4, a 
dc in 1 st st of 10 ch, ch 2, triple tc in loop, finish this and 3d wheel the 
same, turn, and under each 2 ch make a tiny scallop of 1 sc, 2 dc, 



LEAF AND STAR CENTRE-PIECE. 37 

i sc, with i sc between wheels; join, and make a close, firm border 
around space inside of 5 dc on lower spokes, with 2 dc in centre of 
wheel loop ; join and fasten, leaving an end long enough to thread 
in needle and fill in the centre with 6 crossed threads, and a tiny 
spider. On your linen mark a circle 3^ inches in diameter, button- 
hole the edge closely, cut away the outside, and fasten the crocheted 
points on with needle and thread, or with a si st when working 3d 
small scallop. The points may be joined with needle and thread, 
or when working, with si st. 

A dainty little doily, and easily made. The Irish flax thread gives 
a richness to the most ordinary work. 



LEAF AND STAR CENTRE-PIECE. 

[Contributed by Clara A. Stone, Holliston, Mass.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 50, 3-cord, 200-yards 
spools, and steel hook, size o. One spool is sufficient. 
Ch 12, join. 

1. 24 dc in ring, join. 

2. Ch 6, miss 2, tc in next, * ch 3, miss 2, tc in next, repeat 6 
times, ch 3 and join to 3d of 6 ch. 

3. Start each row with 3 ch for a tc, and join to top of 3 ch at 
end, * 3 tc under 3 ch, ch 2 ; repeat. 

4. 5 tc over 3 tc (making 2 tc in 1st and last), ch 2 ; repeat. 

5 j 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13. Same as 4th row, increasing 2 tc 
each time. The 13th row has 23 tc. 

14. 21 tc on 23 tc, missing 1st and last, ch 2, tc under 2 ch, ch 
2, and repeat. 

15. 19 tc on 21 tc, missing 1st and last, ch 3, tc in tc, ch 3 ; 
repeat. 

16. 17 tc (the diamond decreases regularly), ch 5, tc in tc, ch 
5 ; repeat. 

17. 15 tc, ch 4, tc in tc, ch 2, tc in same, ch 2, tc in same, ch 
4 ; repeat. 



38 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES, 



18. 13 tc, ch 3, 7 tc in last st of 4 ch, ch 2, tc in 2d of 3 tc, ch 
2, miss 3, 7 tc in next, ch 3 ; repeat. 

19. 11 tc, ch 4, 7 tc in 7 tc, ch 1, tc in tc, ch 1, 7 tc in 7 tc, 
ch 4 ; repeat. 




Leaf and Star Centre-piece. 



20. 9 tc, ch 6, 5 tc in 7 tc, missing 1st and last, ch 1, 7 tc in 
top of 1 tc, ch 1, 5 tc in middle 5 of 7 tc, ch 6 ; repeat. 

21. 7 tc, ch 2, miss 2, tc in next, ch 2, miss 2, tc in next, ch 2, 
3 tc in 5 tc, ch 2, 7 tc in 7 tc, ch 2, 3 tc in 5 tc, ch 2, miss 2, tc in 
next, ch 2, miss 2, tc in next, ch 2 ; repeat. 

22. 5 tc, * ch 2, miss 2, tc in next, repeat from * 5 times, 5 tc 
in 7 tc, missing 1st and last, * ch 2, miss 2, tc in next, repeat 5 
times, 4 tc in 4 tc; repeat from 1st *. 



HANDKERCHIEF BORDER. 39 

23. 3 tc in middle of 5 tc, 7 spaces ; repeat all around. 

24. Tc in middle of 3 tc, * ch 2, tc under next 2 ch, repeat from 
* 6 times ; repeat from beginning of row. 

25. 26, 27. Plain spaces of tc under 2 ch, ch 2, tc under next 2 
ch, and repeat. 

28. Tc in each st of last row. 

29. Tc in 3 st, ch 6, miss 5, dc in each of 7, ch 5 ; repeat. 

30. 5 tc in 3 tc and ch on each side, ch 7, miss 1 dc, 5 dc in 5 
dc, ch 7 ; repeat. 

31. 3 tc in ch and 1st 2 tc, ch 4, miss 1 tc, 3 tc in next 3 sts, 
ch 8, 3 dc in middle of 5 dc, ch 8 ; repeat. 

32. 3 tc in ch and 1st 2 tc, ch 4, tc in 2d st of 4 ch of last row, 
ch 2, tc in next st, ch 4, miss 2, 3 tc in next 3 st, ch 9, dc in 
middle of 3 dc, ch 9 ; repeat. 

33. 2 tc on ch and 1 in 1st tc, ch 7, fasten back in 4th st from 
hook to form a p, ch 2, tc in middle of 4 ch, p, ch 2, tc in 2 ch, ch 
6, fasten back in 4th st, ch 1, tc in same place, ch 7, fasten to form 
p, ch 2, tc in middle of 4 ch, p, ch 2, tc in 3d tc and in 2 st of ch, 
ch 2 ; repeat. 

If wanted larger, as for an organ-stool tidy, or similar use, coarser 
linen may be used, or the design may be readily enlarged by making 
the diamonds wider, repeating the 13th row as many times as neces- 
sary. The rows of plain spaces may be increased as well, and any 
border added that is preferred. 



HANDKERCHIEF BORDER. 

[Contributed by Mrs. N. E. Rowe, 49 Oak Street, Taunton, Mass. J 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax lace thread, No. 250, 2 -cord, 200- 
yards spools, 6 yards honiton braid, 6-inch square of fine linen lawn, 
and hook, size 000. 

Ch 5, join. 

1. Ch 5, * tc in ring, ch 2, repeat from * 6 times, join to 3d of 
5 ch. 

2. Ch 4, 2 dtc, all under 2 ch of last row, keeping top loop of 
each on hook and working all off together, ch 5, 3 dtc under same 



40 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 



ch, working off as before, make 2 groups of 3 dtc, separated by 5 ch 
under each 2 ch, and join last 5 ch with sc to top of ist 4 ch. 

3. Cut 8 medallions, and join ends. Sc up to 3d of 5 ch, * ch 
3, sc in 1 st third of medallion, ch 3, sc in next 5 ch, ch 3, fasten in 
medallion about % 6 inch from ist fastening, ch 3, sc in next 5 ch, 







Handkerchief Border. 



and repeat from * all around, completing a wheel. To join, fasten 
thread in ist loop of medallion in the wheel taken for the ist one, 
ch 7, sc in centre of medallion, ch 7, sc in last loop of same, ch 7, 



HANDKERCHIEF BORDER. 41 

sc in ist loop of next medallion, ch 20, sc in centre, ch 20, sc in 
last loop, ch 7, sc in ist loop of next medallion, and repeat, filling 3 
medallions with short and 2 with long chs. For the 2d wheel, 
fasten thread as before, ch 3, sc in 4th st of 7 ch (of ist wheel, in 
front of the long ch), ch 3, sc in ist loop of next medallion, ch 3, 
sc in 4th st of 7 ch, ch 3, sc in centre of same medallion, ch 3, sc 
in 4th of 7 ch, ch 3, sc in last loop of medallion, ch 3, sc in 4th st 
of 7 ch, ch 3, sc in ist loop of next medallion, ch 20, sc in centre 
of same, ch 20, sc in last loop of same, ch 7, sc in ist loop of next; 
repeat, working 4 medallions with short and 4 with long chs. This 
completes 2d wheel; join 5 more like last, making 7 in a strip. 

To join the corner wheel, fasten thread in ist loop of medallion, 
ch 3, sc in 4th st of 7 ch of ist wheel, ch 3, sc in centre of same 
medallion, ch 3, sc in 4th st of next 7 ch, ch 3, sc in last loop of 
medallion, ch 3, sc in 4th st of next 7 ch, ch 3, 1 sc in ist loop of 
next medallion, ch 20, sc in centre of same medallion, ch 20, sc in 
last loop of medallion, ch 7, sc in ist loop of next, ch 7, sc in centre 
of same, ch 7, sc in last loop. Fourth wheel, to be joined to the 
corner one : Fasten thread in ist loop of medallion, ch 3, sc in 4th 
st of 7 ch of corner wheel, ch 3, sc in centre of same medallion, ch 
3, sc in 4th st of 7 ch, ch 3, sc in last loop, ch 3, sc in 4th st of 7 
ch, ch 3, sc in ist loop of next medallion, ch 20, sc in centre, 
ch 10, put needle through loops of each 20 ch, make 1 sc, ch 
10, sc in last loop of medallion, ch 3, sc in 4th st of next 7 
ch (of 2d wheel), ch 3, sc in ist loop of next medallion, ch 3, sc 
in 4th st of next 7 ch, ch 3, sc in centre, ch 3, sc in 4th st of next 
7 ch, ch 3, sc in last loop of medallion, ch 3, sc in 4th st of next 7 
ch, ch 3, sc in ist loop of next medallion, ch 20, sc in centre of 
same, ch 20, sc in last loop of same, ch 7, sc in ist loop of medal- 
lion, ch 7, sc in centre, ch 7, sc in last. The other corners are 
joined in same manner. 

After all the wheels are made and joined, work around the centre 
as follows: Fasten thread in last 7 ch next to corner, ch 10, put 
needle through each loop of 20 ch, fasten with sc, ch 10, sc in next 
7 ch (of next wheel), ch 3, sc in next 7 ch, ch 3, sc in next 7 ch, ch 
3, sc in next 7 ch, ch 10, join the loops of 20 ch as before, and re- 
peat around centre. For the picot edge, fasten thread in ist loop 



42 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 



of medallion, ch 9, sc in 3d st of 9 ch to form a p, ch 3, sc in centre 
of same medallion, ch 9, sc in 3d st, ch 3, sc in last loop, ch 9, sc 
in 3d st, ch 3, sc in 1st loop of next medallion, and repeat. 

These wheels, joined,' make beautiful tidies, cushion-covers, 
border for ties, etc., or in coarser thread, with novelty braid, form a 
handsome finish for table-covers, bureau-scarfs, and similar articles. 



DOILY WITH MALTESE BRAID. 



[Contributed by Mrs. R. A. Hawkins, Okolona, Miss.] 




Doily with Maltese Braid. 



Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 120, 3-cord, 200-yards 
spools, steel hook, size 000, square of linen 4X4 inches, and J^- 
inch pin or staple. 



ENGLISH POINT, LEAF LACE. 43 

Directions are given for Maltese work in Nos. 4, 5, and 6 of 
Barbour's Prize Needlework Series. This is slightly heavier. Make 
a loop in thread, and place it on the prong, holding this down so 
the work will slip off readily. Turn pin over, make 2 dc on thread, 
* turn, dc in 1st dc and 1 dc in centre, 1 dc under loop, turn. This 
makes 3 dc between loops. Repeat to required length. Make a ch 
on both sides of braid, catching 1 loop in every 2d ch. Baste braid 
to pattern, following instructions given for Battenburg lace-making 
in Book No. 6. For the rings, take Barbour's flossette, size ***, 
wind 12 times around small pencil, and buttonhole with the No. 102 
thread, finishing each with 11 p in point de Venise. Fasten rings 
in place by carrying thread back and forth from braid to p, fasten- 
ing thread each time with a knot-stitch so it will not slip. When lace 
is complete, baste centre to inner circle of braid, remove from pat- 
tern, baste on right side up, and buttonhole around centre with 
flossette. Finish outer edge with loops of 3 ch, caught in each p. 

The Maltese braid may be used for any Battenburg pattern instead 
of the plain braid. The effect is very lovely. 



ENGLISH POINT, LEAF LACE. 

[Contributed by S. Viletta Doane, Essex, Conn.] 

Materials: Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 100, 3-cord, 200-yards 
spools; 2 spools for 1 yard of lace ; and 2 steel needles, No. 18. 
Cast on, very loosely, 52 sts. 

1. F, k 6, o, n, o, k 5, (o, k 1, o, n, k 1, n,) o, k 1, o, k 5, o, k 1 
o, k 1, (o, k 2, n, o, k 1,) o 2, k 1, o, n, o, k 3, n, n, k 3, o, n, k 3. 

2. K 5, p 13, (o, k 3, o, n 3 tog,) o, p 4, o, p 7, o, k 2, (o, n 
3 tog, o, k 3,) o, p 14, f, loop on loosely 5 new sts. 

3. O, k 5, o, n, o, k 7, o, k 1, o, k 6, (o, n, k 1, n, o, k 1,) o, n, 
k 2, o, k 8, o, n, o, k 3, (o, k 1, o, n, k 1, n,) o, k 3, o, n, o, k 2, n, 
n, k 2, o, n, k 3. 

4. K 5, p 13, (k 3 tog, o, k 3, o,) p 15, o, k 3 tog, (o, k 3, o, 
k 3 tog,) o, p 26. 



44 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES, 



5. O, k 7, o, k 1, o, k 9, o, k 1, o, k 9, (o, k 1, o, n, k 2,) o, k 3, 
o, k 1, o, k 10, o, k 5, (o, k 2, n, o, k 1,) o 2, k 5, o, n, o, k 1, n, 
n, k 1, o, n, k 3. 

6. K 5, p 13, (o, k 3, b, n 3 tog,) o, p 24, (o, n 3 tog, o, k 3,) 

o, P 3 2 - 




English Point, Leaf Lace. 



7. O, k 9, o, n, k 2, n, n, k 3, o, n, o, k 3, n, n, k 3, (o, n, k 1, 
n, o, k 1,) o, k 5, o, n, o, k 2, n 4 times, k 1, o, k 8, (o, k 1, o, n, 
k 1, n,) o, k 7, o, n, o, n, n, o, n, k 3. 

8. K 5, p 13, (n 3 tog, o, k 3, o,) p 24, (o, k 3, o, k 3 tog,) o, 

P 3* 



ENGLISH POINT, LEAF LACE, 



45 



9. 0, n, k 2, n, n, k 3, o, k 2, n, n, k 1, n, o, n, k 1, 11 3 tog, 
n 3 tog, k i, n, (o, k 1, o, n, k 1, n,) o, k 7, o, 114 times, o, k 2, n, n, 
k 3, (o, n, k 1, n, o, k 1,) o, k 9, o, n, o, n, o, n, k 3. 

10. K 5, p 13, (o, k 3, 0,11 3 tog,) p 22, (o, n 3 tog, o, k 3,) o 
2, P 23. 

11. O, n, k 1, n, n, k 2,0, 11 4 times, 0,113 times, o, ki, (o, n, k 

1, n, o, k 1,) o, k 9, o, n 6 times, k 1, o, k 1, (o, k 1, o, n, ki,n,) 
o, k 1, o, n, o, k 3, n, 11, k 3, o, n, k 3. 

12. K 5, p 13, (n 3 tog, o, k 3, o,) k 1, o, p 18, (o, k 3, o, n 3 
tog,) o, k 3, o, p 16. 

13. O, n 8 times, o, k 1, o, k 2, n, (o, k 1, o, n, k 1, n,) o, n, k 

2, n, n, k 2, n 4 times, k 1, o, k 1, (o, n, k 1, n, o, k 1,) o 2, k 3, 
o, n, o, k 2, n, n, k 2, o, n, k 3. 

14. K 5, p 13, (o, k 3, o, n 3 tog,) o, k 3, o, p 13, (11 3 tog, o, 
k 3, o) 2 times, p 9. 

15. O, k 1, n, n, n 4 tog, (o, n, k 1, n, o, k 1) 2 times, o, n 6 
times, (o, k 1, o, n, ki, n) 2 times, o, k 5, o, n, o, k 1, n, n, k 1, o, 
n, k 3. 

16. K 5, p 13, (n 3 tog, o, k 3, o) 2 times, p 6, (o, k 3, o, n 3 
tog) 2 times, o, k 1, o, p 5, pick up 2 loops on the side of the edge 
leaf, and f them together. 

17. F, n, n 3 tog, o, k 3, (o, k 1, o, n, k 1, n) 2 times, n, n, n, 
(n, k 1, n, o, k 1, o) 2 times, o, k 7, o, n, o, n, n, o, n, k 3. 

18. K 5, p 13, (o, k 3, o, n 3 tog) 5 times, o, n, k 1, f. 

19. F, k 1, n, (o, k 1, o, n, k 1, n) 5 times, k 9, o, n, o, n, o, n, 

20. K 5, p 13, (n 3 tog, o, k 3, o) 5 times, k 2, f. 
Repeat from row 1st. 

To f (or fagot) o 2, p 2 tog. This o 2 makes but 1 st when 
knitting back. In making an over or o be sure to put the thread 
over or around the needle in such a manner that it can easily be 
knitted for 1 st when knitting back. O 2 should be knitted as 2 
sts when knitting back, except in fagots. Care should be taken not 
to knit too tight, as it causes the lace to draw. The lace may be 
made of any desired width by repeating the parts in parenthesis the 
requisite number of times, allowing 6 sts for each repeat. A 



46 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

handsome narrow edge may be knit by using in the odd-numbered 
rows the directions from the first through the first parentheses, and 
adding 3 plain sts for heading, and in the even rows directions for 
the last parentheses, and from thence to the end of the row. A 
separate insertion is formed by directions in both parentheses, with 
the directions between, and 3 plain sts added to each edge. 



CORSET-COVER YOKE. 

[Contributed by Mrs. Carrie Fisher, Wilmington, Vt.] 

Materials: Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 120, 3-cord, 200- 
yards spools, 2 No. 19 needles, or finer if desired. 
Cast on 43 sts, k across plain. 

1. O, n, k 1, f (that is, o 2, p 2 tog), n, o 2, n, f, k 8, n, o, k 1, 
o, n, k 8, f, n, o 2, n, f, k 3. 

2. O, n, k 1, f, k 2, p 1, k 1, f, p 21, f, k 2, p 1, k 1, f, k 3. 

3. O, n, k 1, f, k 4, f, k 7, n, o, k 3, o, n, k 7, f, k 4, f, k 3. 

4. O, n, k 1, f, k4, f, p 21, f, k 4, f, k 3. 

5. O, n, k 1, f, n, o 2, n, f, k 7, n, o, k 3, o, n, k 7, f, n, o 2, n, 
f, k 3. 

6. Like 2d row. 

7. O, n, k 1, f, k 4, f, k 9, o, k 3 tog, o, k 9, f, k 4, f, k 3. 

8. Like 4th row. 

9. O, n, k 1, f, n, o 2, n, f, k 2, n, o, k 1, o, n, k 7, n, o, k 1, 
o, n, k 2, f, n, o 2, n, f, k 3. 

10. Like 2d row. 

11. O, n, k 1, f, k 4, f, k 1, n, o, k 3, o, n, k 5, n, o, k 3, o, n, 
k 1, f, k 4, f, k 3. 

12. Like 4th row. 

13. O, n, k 1, f, n, o 2, n, f, k 1, n, o, k 3, o, n, k 5, n, o, k 
3, o, n, k 1, f, n, o 2, n, f, k 3. 

14. Like 2d row. 



CORSET-COVER YOKE. 



4' 



15. 0, n, k 1, f, k 4, f, k 3, o, k 2 tog, o, k 9, o, k 3 tog, 0, k 
3, f, k 4, f, k 3. 

16. Like 4th row. 




Corset-cover Yoke. 



Repeat from 1st row for length desired. Any pretty knitted edge 
may be added to the insertion, making a handsome pattern for wide 
lace. For the narrow neck-strip, cast on 13 sts, k across plain. 

1. SI 1, k 1, f, n. o 2, n, f, k 3.' 

2. O, n, k 1, f, k 2, p 1, k 1, f, k 2. 



48 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES, 



3. SI i, k 1, f, k 4, f, k 3. 

4. O, n, k 1, f, k 4, f, k 2. 

Repeat for length required. Join to wide insertion, drawing nar- 
row ribbon through eyelets, as shown. 



ROSE-LEAF AND FERN LACE. 

[Contributed by Miss S. Viletta Doane, Essex, Conn.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 80, 3-cord, 200-yards 
spools, and 2 steel needles, No. 18. 
Cast on 19 sts. 




Rose-Leaf and Fern Lace. 



1. (), k i, o, n, o, k 3, n, n, k 2, n, o, 11, k 3. 

2. 4, 6, 8. K 5, p 13. 

3. O, k 3, o, n, o, k 2, n, n, k 2, o, n, k 3. 
5. O, k 5, o, n, o, k 1, n, n, k 1, o, n, k 3. 
7. O, k 7, o, n, o, n, n, o, n, k 3. 

9. O, k 9, o, n, o, n, o, n, k 3. 

10. K 5, p 14. 
Repeat from 1st row. 



TATTED DOILY, 



49 



TATTED DOILY. 

[Contributed by Mrs. P. M. Hobrox, Rutherford, X J.] 

Materials: Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 150, 3-cord, 200 
yards spools, and tatting shuttle. 




Tatted Doily. 



The centre of the rosette is formed of 12 p, with 2 T / 2 dk between 
each, close and tie. The small ring is of 3 p, with 2 dk between 
each, joining middle p to centre already made. * Turn over, make 



50 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

a ring of 7 p with 2 dk between each ; turn, make 2 dk, join to p 
on small ring, 2 dk, join to centre, 2 dk, p, 2 dk, close ; repeat 
until you have the rosette of 12 rings, alternating small and large; 
tie. Join 4 rosettes diamond-shape. For the bars, begin with a 
small ring, turn, make a large ring, join to diamond between middle 
p of ring, repeat once, make 2 large and 3 small rings, join to next 
rosette of diamond. When making the ends of bars, the 2 small 
rings and 1 large ring in the centre are made without turning work. 
This doily suggests a very pretty tidy, made of No. 60 or No. 70 
Irish flax thread. If liked, the diamonds may be made of 9 rosettes, 
3 each way, or 16, 4 each way, with ribbon run between them, if pre- 
ferred, instead of using the tatted bars. These rosettes make a 
lovely edge for linen doilies or centre-pieces. 



CHILD'S TATTED YOKE. 

[Contributed by Mrs. Mary Knight, Minneota, Minn.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 60, in balls, or 3-cord, 
200-yards spools, with tatting shuttles. 

Make the wheels as follows, beginning at lower edge of front : A 
ring of 8 p, each separated by 2 dk, close ; 2 dk, p, 2 dk, join to a 
p of ring, 2 dk,rp, 2 dk, close ; join 2d thread, 4 dk, 5 p, each 
separated by 2 dk, 4 dk ; with 1 thread, make another small ring, 
and alternate until there are eight of each, the small rings joined to 
the middle ring. This completes the wheel. Cut a paper pattern 
of the size of yoke required. That shown has 10 wheels for lower 
row of front, each joined to the preceding by middle picots of 2 
scallops. The sample clearly shows how the yoke is formed. Fill 
edges at neck and back with half wheels, and crochet a ch around, 
if desired. 

In these days of laces, tatting is again in high favor. It may be 
as delicate as desired. The little wheels described may be used for 
a blouse, permitting the showing through of a silk lining. Simply 
have a pattern, well-fitted over the shoulders as a guide — an old 
dress-waist, with the under-arm seams and darts ripped serves well. 



NETTED DOILIES. 



51 



Join the wheels to cover the pattern, and remove when completed. 
Crocheted wheels may be used, if liked, and a combination of ecru 




Child's Tatted Yoke. 



and white flax thread is very effective. Or a gray over scarlet or 
cardinal lining mav be used. With these blouses a silk waist that is 
a little " gone by " may be used, forming a really elegant toilet. 



NETTED DOILIES. 



[Contributed by Clara F. Atwood, 126 Princeton Street, East Boston, Mass.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 120, 3-cord, 200-yards 
spools, small netting needle (No. 19), mesh-sticks, % and J /z inch 
wide, knitting-needles No. 12 and No. 14. 

Doily No. 1. — 36 sts in loop over J^-in. mesh; 3 rounds over 
needle; 2 sts in 1, over mesh ; 4 rounds over needle, 1 round over 



52 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 



mesh ; i round over needle, draw left st through right, net, then net 
right st through left, making a twisted st ; 2 rounds over needle ; 1 
over mesh • 1 over mesh, netting 3 sts into 2 sts taken together ; 3 
over needle ; 1 round, netting 2 sts in 1, over mesh; 3 over needle ; 
1 over mesh; 11 over needle, making a cross-st by netting first the 




Netted Doilies, 



left, then the right st ; 2 over needle ; 1 over mesh, with doubled 
thread. 

Doily No. 2. — 34 sts in loop, over mesh ; 3 rounds over needle ; 



NETTED DOILIES. 53 

i round, netting 2 sts in 1, over mesh ■ 4 over needle ; 1 over mesh; 

1 over needle, twisted-st, as above ; 2 over needle ; 1 over mesh ; 1 
over mesh, netting 3 sts in 2 taken together ; 3 over needle ; 1 over 
mesh ; 1 over mesh, 2 sts taken together, with doubled thread ; 1 over 
mesh, into each st with doubled thread ; 1 over mesh, single thread, 
putting 3 sts in 1 ; 3 over needle ■ 1 over mesh, netting 7 sts into 
every 5th; 1 over needle, netting end st through middle st in the 
space, forming a sh; 1 over needle. 

Doily No. 3. — 36 sts in loop, over 3/3 -in. mesh; 5 rounds over 
needle ; 1 over mesh, 3 sts in 1 ; 5 over needle ; 1 over mesh, 
doubled thread ; 1 over needle, netting first left, then right, making 
the cross-st ; 2 over needle ; 1 over mesh, 2 sts in 1 ; 1 over needle, 

2 sts together ; 1 over needle ; 4 over needle twice, then over needle 
once, in every other st, making picot edge ; 1 over mesh ; 1 over 
mesh, 8 sts in every other st ; 1 over needle, drawing loop through 
extra loop, for sh border ; 1 over needle. 

Doily No. 4. — 32 sts in loop, over J^-in. mesh; 4 rounds over 
needle ; 1 over mesh, 2 sts in 1 ; 4 over needle ; 1 over mesh ; 1 
over needle, making the twisted st ; 3 over needle ; 1 over mesh, 
netting 1, then 2 sts in 1, alternately; 3 over needle; 1 over mesh, 
with doubled thread ; 1 over needle, making the cross-st ; 1 over 
needle ; 1 over mesh, netting into every 2d st ; 1 over mesh, netting 
1 st and 7 sts alternately, for pineapple edge ; 1 over needle, 6 sts 
into 7 sts, thread over needle 3 times between ; 1 over needle, 5 sts 
in 6, thread over 4 times, and so continue to end of point, decreas- 
ing sts, and increasing the overs. 

Doily No. 5. — 38 sts over mesh, in loop ; 4 rounds over needle ; 
1 over mesh, 2 sts in 1 ; 4 over needle ; 1 over mesh ; 1 over needle, 
making the twist-st ; 1 over needle ; 1 over mesh ; 1 over mesh, 3 sts 
into 2 taken together ; 3 over needle ; 1 over mesh, 2 sts in 1 ; 2 
over needle ; 1 over needle, netting 9 sts, thread over twice, leaving 
1 st ; net 9, and so on ; 1 over needle, netting 8 sts in 9 sts, thread 
over 3 times, etc. ; 1 over needle, netting 7 sts in 8 sts, thread over 
4 times, and continue to end of point. 

Doily No. 6. — 37 sts in loop, over mesh ; 4 rounds over No. 12 
needle ; 1 over mesh, 2 sts in 1 ; 7 over needle No. 14 ; 1 over mesh ; 



54 harbour's prize needle-work series. 

twist i, then 2 sts in 1, alternately; 4 over needle ; 1 over mesh; 1 
over mesh, 3 sts in 2, taken together; 2 over needle No. 14 ; 1 over 
needle No. 14, netting 7 sts y thread over twice, miss 1 st, and repeat ; 
1 over same needle, net 6 sts, thread over 3 times ; 1 over needle, 
netting 5 sts, thread over 4 times ; continue to end of point. 

When size is not mentioned, the J^-in. mesh is used, and No. 14 
needle. Although but four doilies are illustrated, directions are 
given for the set of six. Nothing daintier for a little tea-table can be 
imagined. Instructions for netting are very accurately given, with 
complete illustrations, in No. 5 of Barbour's Prize Needlework Series. 



BOBBIN LACES. 

[Contributed by Miss Edna D. Stoddard, Roxbury, Mass.] 

Lace, No. 1. Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 80, 3-cord, 
200-yards spools, 14 pairs of bobbins. Pin 6 pairs in 35, 3 pairs in 
31, 3 pairs in 34, and 2 pairs in 7,7,. 

Ctc 8th and 9th, pin in 1 ; etc to left, using 6th pair, pin in 2 ; 
etc to right using 10th, pin in 3; to left, using 7th, pin in 4; to 
right, using 12th, pin in 5 ; to left, using 8th, pin in 6 ; to right, 

using 10th. (a) 
Wt nth and 
12th, ctc nth, 
12th, 13th, and 
14th, using a 
pair as single 
bobbin, wt nth 
and T2th, 13th and 14th; make a picot, putting pin under thread 
of last bobbin from right to left, back over from left to right, form- 
ing a loop, then put pin in 7 ; 2 wt 13th and 14th, picot, pin in 8 ; 
2 wt as before, picot, pin in 9 ; close with wt, ctc with nth to 14th 
as before, using pairs as single bobbins, wt 13th, 14th, and nth 
and 1 2th (a), ctc 10th and nth, nth and 12th, pin in 10, ctc to 
left, using 8th. Tw 6th, ctc 5th and 6th, pin in 11, close with ctc; 
tw 5th, (b) ctc 4th and 5th, 3d and 4th, tw 3d once, wt 2d and 3d, 
1st and 2d, pin in 12 ; wt 1st and 2d to close, wt 2d and 3d, ctc 3d 




BOBBIN LACES, 



55 



2 • 3 ' 



- .20 . 
• •26.2-r 



16 -28 .- 



• 3D -29 ~>V "23 



32 „ -3. . 35 



and 4th, 4th and 5th (b). Tw 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th 3 times, (c) etc 
6th and 7th, 7th and 8th, 5th and 6th, 6th and 7th, pin in 13 ; etc 

6th and 7th (to close) 7th, and 8th, 5th 

and 6th, 6th and 7th (c), tw all 3 times. 

Repeat (b) to (b), pin in 14; tw 5th 

once, etc 5 th and 6th, pin in 15 ; close 

with etc, tw 5th once, repeat from (b) to 

(b), pin in 16; tw 5th and 6th once, 

etc 8th and 9th, 9th and 10th ; repeat (a) 

to (a), putting pins, respectively, in 17, 

18, 19. Ctc 10th and nth, nth and 

1 2th, pin in 20 ; ctc to left, using 8th, pin 

in 21 • to right, using 10th; repeat from 

(a) to (a), putting pins in 22, 23, and 24 ; ctc 10th and nth, nth 

and 12th, pin in 25 ; to left, using 7th, pin in 26; to right, using 

10th, pin in 27 ; to left, using 6th, pin in 28 ; to right, using 9th, pin 

in 29 ] to left, using 5th, pin in 30 ; to right, using 8th, pin in 31 ; to 

left, using 6th ; tw 5th once, repeat from (b) to (b), putting pin in 32 ; 

tw 5 th once, ctc 5th and 6th, pin in 33 ; ctc to right, using 8th, tw 5th 

once, repeat from (b) to (b), pin in 34 • tw 5th once ; tw 9th and 10th, 

3 times, wt nth and 12th, ctc with 1 ith, 12th, 13th, and 14th, as single 

bobbins, 2 wt 13th and 14th, wt nth and 12th; repeat (c) to (c), 

using 9th, 10th, nth, and 12th pairs, putting pin in 35. Tw 9th 

and 10th 3 times, wt nth, and 12th, ctc with nth, 12th, 13th, and 

14th, as single bobbins; wt nth and 12th, 13th and 14th. Repeat 

from beginning. 

Insertion No. 2. Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 150, 
3 -cord, 200-yards spools, and 16 pairs of bobbins. Pin 2 pairs in 
7> 23, ^6, 37, ^8, 27, and 13, 1 pair in 34 and 35. 

Left edge : Wt 1st and 2d pairs, pin in 1 : * close with wt ; tw 1st 
and 2d pairs once \ ctc 2d and 3d, 3d and 4th *, pin in 2, close with 

ctc • * ctc to left, using 
2d ; tw 2d twice, wt 1st 
and 2d, pin in 3 ; do not 
close, * ; repeat from 
1 st to 2d *, ctc with 4th 
and 5 th, pin in 4, repeat 




56 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

from 3d to 4th *, pin in 5 \ repeat from 1st to 2d * pin in 6 ; repeat 
from 3d to 4th *, pin in 7, repeat from 1st to 2d *. 

Right edge: Wt 15th and 16th, pin in 8, * close with wt, tw 
both pairs once. Ctc 14th and 15th, 13th and 14th *, pin in 9, 
close with ctc ; * ctc to right, using 15th, tw 15 th twice, wt 15 th and 
16th, pin in 10, do not close, * \ repeat from 1st to 2d * ; ctc 12th 
and 13th, pin in 11, close with ctc; repeat from 3d to 4th *, putting 
pin in 12. Repeat from 1st to 2d *, pin in 13 ; repeat from 3d to 
4th *, pin in 14 ; repeat from 1st to 2d *. 

Centre : Wt 8th and 9th, pin in 15, close with ctc; ctc 9th and 
10th, 10th and nth, pin in 16 ; ctc to left, using 6th, pin in 17 ; to 
right, using 12th, pin in 18 ; to left, using 5th, pin in 19 \ to right, 

using 9th, pin in 20 ; to left, using 5 th, pin in 
21 ; to right, using 8th, pin in 22 ; to left, using 
5th, tw 5th twice, ctc 4th and 5th, pin in 23 ; 
close (as usual) with ctc, tw 5th twice, ctc with 
5th and 6th, pin in 24 ; ctc to right, using 7th. 
Commencing with 9th and 10th, ctc to right, 
using 12th, pin in 25 ; to left, using 9th, pin in 
26; to right, using 12th, tw 12th twice, ctc 
12th and 13th, pin in 27, close with ctc, tw 
12th twice, ctc nth and 12th, pin in 28 ; ctc 
to left, using 10th, tw 8th and 9th twice, wt 
8th and 9th, tw once ; ctc 9th and 10th, pin in 29 ; to right, using 
1 2th, pin in 30 ; to left, using 9th; ctc 7th and 8th, pin in 31 • ctc 
to left, using 5th, pin in 32 ; to right, using 9th, pin in 33 ; again, to 
right, using 12th, pin in 34; to left, using 5th, pin in 35 ; ctc to 
right, using nth, pin in 7,6 ; to left, using 6th, pin in 37 • to right, 
using 9th, pin in 38, close with ctc; ht 8th and 9th; wt 10th and 
nth, tw 1 2th twice; wt 6 th and 7 th, tw 5 th twice ; ctc 13th and 
14th, 14th and 15th, tw 15th twice, ctc 3d and 4th, 2d and 3d, tw 
2d twice. 



DIAMOND LACE. 

Materials : Barbour's new Irish flax lace thread, No. 250, 3-cord, 
200-yards spools, 31 pairs of bobbins, and lace-desk, or suitable 



•6 • 1*7 li , - 6 . -| 

•19 2 . D 18. ,|3 
2*3 -21 2* '26 2S -27 -l 
. .*!,. *29 2 Q . 

m 33 " • 

32. . -3D 
• *24 . 



DIAMOND LACE 



57 



cushion. Pin 4 pairs in 150, 3 in 149, 1 in 139, 127, 121, 117, no, 
106, 99, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 2 in 95, 1 in 82, 81, 80, 79, 78, 151, 
152, and 3 in 153. 

Ht 5th and 6th, pin in 1 ; ht 6th and 7th, pin in 2 ; ht to left, 
using 4th, pin in 3 ; to right, using 8th, pin in 4 ; to left, using 3d, 
pin in 5 ; to right, using 9th, pin in 6 ; to left, using 4th, pin in 7 \ 
to right, using 10th, 
pin in 8; to left, 
using 4th; (a) wt 
2d and 3d, 1 st and 
2d, pin in 9, wt to 
close, wt 2d and 3d 
(a) ; ht 3d and 4th, 
pin in 10; ht to 
right, using nth, 
pin in n ; to left, 
using 4th, pin in 12 ; 
to right, using 10th, 
pin in 13 ; to left, 

Using 4th; repeat Diamond Lace. 

(a) to (a), putting pin in 14 ; ht 3d and 4th, in pin 15 ; to right, 
using 9th, pin in 16 ; to left, using 4th, pin in 17 ; ht to right, using 
8th, pin in 18 ; ht to left, using 4th, repeat (a) to (a), putting pin 
in 19 ; ht 3d and 4th, pin in 20 ; to right, using 7th, pin in 21 ; to 
left, using 4th, pin in 22 ; to right, using 6th, pin in 23 ; repeat (a) 
to (a), pin in 24 ; ht 3d and 4th, pin in 25 • repeat (a) to (a), pin 
in 26 ; ht 4th and 5th, pin in 27 ; ht 3d and 4th, pin in 28 ; repeat 
(a) to (a), putting pin in 29. 

Ht 17th and 18th, pin in 30 ; ht to right, using 19th, pin in 31 : 
to left, using 16th, pin in 32 ; to right, using 20th, pin in 33 ; to 
left, using 15 th, pin in 34; to right, using 21st, pin in 35 ; to left, 
using 14th, pin in 36 ; to right, using 2 2d, pin in 37 ; to left, using 
13th, pin in 38 ; to right, using 23d, pin in 39 ; to left, using 12th, 
pin in 40 ; to right, using 2 2d, pin in 41 ; to left, using 13th, pin in 
42 ; to right, using 21st, pin in 43 ; to left, using 14th, pin in 44 ; to 
right, using 20th, pin in 45 ; to left, using 15th, pin in 46 ; to right, 




58 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 



using 19th, pin in 47 ; to left, using 16th, pin in 48 ; to right, using 
1 8th, pin in 49. 

To form open ground, ht nth and 12th, pin in 50 ; close with ht, 
then twist each pair once. Remember to make this twist after each 
closing, as it will not again be mentioned. Ht 12th and 13th, pin 

in 51 ; 13th and 14th, 
pin in 52 ; 14th and 
15th, pin in 53; 15th 
and 1 6th, pin in 54; 
1 6th and 17th, pin in 
55 ; ht 10th and nth, 
pin in 56 ; 12th and 
13th, pin in 57; 14th 
and 15th, pin in 58; 
9th and 10th, pin in 59 j 
10th and nth, pin in 
60; nth and 12th, pin 
in 61 • 12th and 13th, 
pin in 62 ; 13th and 
14th, pin in 6^ ; 14th 
and i5th,~pin in 64 ; 8th and 9th, pin in 65 ; 10th and nth, pin in 
66 ; 12th and 13th, pin in 67 • 7th and 8th, pin in 68 ; 8th and 9th, 
pin in 69 ; 9th and 10th, pin in 70 ; 10th and nth, pin in 71 ; nth 
and 12th, pin in 72 ; 12th and 13th, pin in 73 ; 6th and 7th, pin in 
74 ; 8th and 9th, pin in 75 ; 10th and nth, pin in 76 ; 5th and 6th, 
pin in 77 ; 6th and 7th, pin in 78 ; 7th and 8th, pin in 79 ; 8th and 
9th, pin in 80 ; 9th and 10th, pin in 81 ; 10th and nth, pin in 82 ; 
ht 23d and 24th, pin in 8^ ; 2 2d and 23d, pin in 84 ; 21st and 2 2d, 
pin in 85; 20th and 21st, pin in 86; 19th and 20th, pin in 87; 
1 8th and 19th, pin in 88 ; continue down the diagonal in same way 
to pin in 95, between nth and 12th pairs. Ht 24th and 25th, pin in 
96; 22d and 23d, pin in 97 ; 20th and 21st, pin in 98; 18th and 
19th, pin in 99 ; 25th and 26th, pin in 100 ; 24th and 25th, pin in 
1 01 ; work down the diagonal thus to 106, between 19th and 20th 
pairs; ht 26th and 27th, pin in 107 ; 24th and 25th, pin in 108; 
22d and 23d, pin in 109; 20th and 21st, pin in no; 27th and 




EDGING. 59 

28th, pin in in ; 26th and 27th, pin in 112; work down diagonal 
to 117, between 21st and 2 2d pairs; ht 28th and 29th, pin in 118; 
26th and 27th, pin in 119; 24th and 25th, pin in 120; 2 2d and 
23d, pin in 121 ; wt 29th and 30th ; ht 28th and 29th, pin in 122 ; 
27th and 28th, pin in 123; work down diagonal to 127, between 
23d and 24th pairs. This completes the open grounds, and the 
pairs are not to be twisted after closing in following directions : 

Wt 30th and 31st, pin in 128 ; wt to left, using 25th pair, pin in 
129; (b) wt to right, using 31st pair, pin in 130 (b) ; wt to left, 
using 26th, pin in 131 ; repeat (b) to (b), putting pin in 132 • to 
left, using 27th, pin in 133 ; repeat (b) to (b), pin in 134 ; to left, 
using 28th, pin in 135; repeat (b) to (b), pin in 136; to left, 
using 29th, pin in 137 ; repeat (b) to (b), pin in 138 ; to left, using 
24th, pin in 139 ; repeat (b) to (b), pin in 140; to left, using 29th, 
pin in 141 ; (b) to (b), pin in 142 ; to left, using 28th, pin in 143 ; 
(b) to (b), pin in 144; to left, using 27th, pin in 145 ; (b) to (b), 
pin in 146 ; to left, using 26th, pin in 147 ; (b) to (b), pin in 148 \ 
to left, using 25th, pin in 149 ; (b) to (b), pin in 150. 

This completes the scallop. Ht 4th and 5th, pin in 151 \ ht 3d 
and 4th, pin in 152 ; repeat (a) to (a), pin in 153. 

This finishes the pattern of lace. The insertion is made in the 
same way, omitting the scallop and working the edge according to 
directions given. 



EDGING. 

Materials: Barbour's new Irish flax lace thread, No. 250, 12 
pairs bobbins. Pin 3 pairs in 23 and in 27, 6 pairs in 28. 

Open hole ground : Ht 3d and 4th (pairs), pin in 1 ; ht 4th and 
5th, pin in 2 ; ht 5th and 6th, pin in 3 ; wt 2d and 3d, 1st and 2d, 
pin in 4 ; wt 2d and 3d ; ht 3d and 4th, pin in 5 ; ht 4th and 5th, 
pin in 6 ; wt 2d and 3d, 1st and 2d, pin in 7 ; wt 2d and 3d ; ht 
3d and 4th, pin in 8 ; wt 2d and 3d, 1st and 2d, pin in 9 ; wt 2d 
and 3d. 

Scallop: Ctc 9th and ioth,-pin in 10; (a) etc to right, using 
nth pair, tw nth twice, wt nth and 12th, pin in 1 1 j tw nth 



60 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 



once (a), etc to left, using 8th pair, pin in i 
pin in 13 ; etc to left, using 7 th, pin in 14 ; 




4th and 5th, pin in 25 ; ht 3d and 4th, pin 
1 st and 2d, pin in 27 ; wt 2d and 3d. 

Spider: Tw 4th, 5th, and 6th twice, 7th, 
(b) etc 6th and 7th, 7th and 8th, 
8th and 9th, 5 th and 6th, 6th and 
7th, 7th and 8th, 4th and 5th, 5th 
and 6th, 6th and 7th (b), pin in 
28 ; repeat (b) to (b), twist all 
pairs used 3 times. 

It will be remembered that a pin 
is always "closed" with the same 
movement that precedes it unless 
otherwise specified. 



2 ; repeat (a) to (a), 
repeat (a) to (a), pin 
in 1 5 ; etc to left, using 
6th pair, pin in 16 ; 
repeat (a) to (a), pin 
in 1 7 ; etc to left, using 
7th, pin in 18 ; repeat 
(a) to (a), pin in 19 ; 
etc to left, using 8th, 
pin in 20 ; repeat (a) 
to (a), pin in 21 ; etc 
to left, using 9th pair, 
pin in 22 ; repeat (a) 
to (a), pin in 23 ; etc 
10th and nth. 

Open hole ground : 
Tw 6th once, ht 5th 
and 6th, pin in 24 ; ht 
in 26 ; wt 2d and 3d, 

8th, and 9 th 3 times ; 




INSERTION. 
Materials: Barbour's new Irish flax lace thread, No. 250, 12 
pairs bobbins. Pin 3 pairs in 28, 3 in 19, 3 in 14, 1 in 25, 26, and 

27. 



MEXICAN BORDER. 61 

Open hole ground : Ht 9th and 10th, pin in 1 ; (a) wt 10th and 
nth, nth and 12th, pin in 2; wt 10th and nth (a) ■ ht 8th and 
9th, pin in 3 ; ht 9th and 10th, pin in 4 ; repeat (a) to (a), pin in 
5 ; ht 7th and 8th, pin in 6 \ ht 8th and 9th, pin in 7 ; ht 9th and 
10th, pin in 8 ; repeat (a) to (a), putting pin in 9 ; ht 6th and 7th, 
pin in 10; ht 7th and 8th, pin in 11; ht 8th and 9th, pin in 12; 
ht 9th and 10th, pin in 13 ; repeat (a) to (a), putting pin in 14 ; 
ht 5th and 6th. pin in 15 ; ht 4th and 5th, pin in 16 ; ht 3d and 
4th, pin in 17 ; (b) wt 2d and 3d, 1st and 2d, pin in 18; wt 2d 
and 3d (b) \ tw 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, and 9th twice; (c) etc 
6th and 7th, 7th and 8th, 8th and gth, 5th and 6th, 6th and 7th, 
7th and 8th, 4th and 5th, 5th and 6th, 6th and 7th (c), pin in 19 ; 
repeat (c) to (c) ; tw all pairs used in spider 3 times. Ht 3d and 
4th, pin in 20 ; repeat (b) to (b), pin in 21 ; ht 4th and 5th, pin in 
22 ; 3d and 4th, pin in 23 ; repeat (b) to (b), putting pin in 24 ; 
ht 5th and 6th, pin in 25 ; ht 4th and 5th, pin in 26 ; ht 3d and 
4th, pin in 27 ; repeat (b) to (b), putting pin in 28. 

The corner is turned as described in No. 5, by working up to a 
diagonal, tying the threads carefully before the last pins, removing 
these, pinning in an opposite diagonal one row holes back, and con- 
tinuing. 

The pattern for this lace and insertion is shown on one block, 
which illustrates also the method of using the checked or quadrille 
paper in taking off patterns. By means of this a pattern may be 
enlarged or reduced with perfect accuracy, designs may be copied 
from lace samples, or originate — which is a most pleasing study. 
Permit me to say that I received my instruction from Barbour's 
Prize Needlework Series No. 3 — the first directions I had ever 
seen, and which are so clear in every particular that I had not the 
slightest difficulty in following them. 



MEXICAN BORDER. 

[Contributed by Miss Jessie D. Roedel, 441 Cumberland Street, Lebanon, Pa.] 

Materials: Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. ioo, 3-cord, 200-yards 
spools, and square of linen as large as required, medium quality. 



62 barbour's prize needle-work: series. 

Make a i^-inch hem; draw 6 threads, or more, according to 
quality of linen. To hemstitch, throw the thread as for a button- 
hole st, take up 4 or 6 threads, st through 2 threads down straight 
to draw it tight. Draw threads, y 2 inch wide, and y 2 inch from hem 
for first border. Hemstitch on both sides, doing the work always 
on the wrong side, buttonhole corners on 2 sides, and wherever the 
linen is cut. Leave y 2 inch plain, * draw space y 16 inch less than 2 



















BBBgggEBEE 






Mexican Border. 



inches, leave y 2 inch, repeat from *, and draw y 2 inch. A descrip- 
tion of drawn-work seems quite superfluous, as it is almost univer- 
sally copied from engravings. This design was copied from a table- 
cover bought from a Mexican, and is very effective. 



DOILY, IN DRAWN-WORK AND CROCHET. 



68 



DOILY, IN DRAWN-WORK AND CROCHET. 

[Contributed by Miss C. S. Lee, 127 Walnut Street, Greenville, Mississippi.] 

Materials : One spool each Barbour's Irish flax linen thread, No. 
100, No. 70, and No. 30, white, 3-cord, 200-yards spools, linen 
Sj4 inches square, with steel hook, size 00. 




Doily, in Drawn-Work and Crochet, 



Draw several threads around square 1 yi inch from edge, and with 
No. 100 thread hemstitch for fringe, or if preferred, turn hem and 
hemstitch. The drawn-work extends diagonally across the doily ; 
draw Y^ inch and miss % inch, each way. Leave % inch between 
this and fringe. Buttonhole with No. 100 thread around the drawn- 
work, the design for which is so simple as to need no description. 
Featherstitch around edge of doily, and around the wheel ; for this 
work use No. 30 thread, and for the wheel No. 70. With ^-inch 
staple, make 20 loops, with 3 dc in centre. The description for 



64 barbour's prize needlk-work series. 

this work has been so often given that details seem unnecessary. 
Fasten thread to a loop on one side, run hook through each of 20 
loops, pick up thread, and draw through all at once. Fasten se- 
curely. Join ends with needle, or sc together. 

1. Make 5 dc in each of 20 outer loops, joining last to first with 
sc. 

2. Dc in each dc, widening every 5th st with 2 dc in 1 st ; 
join. 

3. Dc in each dc ; join. 

4. Ch 10, tc in dc directly over loop below, * ch 7, miss 5, tc in 
next dc, and repeat, joining to 3d of 10 ch. 

5. Dc in each tc and each st of ch ; join. 

6. Dc in dc, widening with 2 dc in centre dc of each ch ; join. 

Baste the wheel firmly in centre of linen corner, buttonhole se- 
curely with No. 100 thread, and cut linen carefully from beneath. 
The wheel is very delicate in appearance, and would be effectively 
applied to larger pieces of work, or it may be used for tidies, 
cushion-covers, etc. 



CORNER, IN SWEDISH DRAWN-WORK. 

[Contributed by Mrs. Hedvig Muller, New York, N.Y.] 

Materials : Barbour's white star flossette, size * * * *, or shade 
No. 40 Ulster rope linen, 10 skeins, 5 skeins Ulster etching flax, 1 
spool Irish flax thread, No. 150, 3-cord, 200-yards spools, and 
square of scrim 32 X 32 inches. 

The design may be readily followed, as the model shows un- 
finished portions. The squares are formed by drawing y$ inch, 
and leaving yi inch. Work over and under the undrawn thread, 
dividing them in two parts, using the etching flax for this purpose. 
The purls in the centre square are made by winding the flax around 
the needle, and drawing through as in Raleigh bars. The spiders 
of wheels filling these squares are of the No. 150 thread. The 
satin-stitch embroidery is of the rope linen, as also are the rows of 
darning-stitch. 



SQUARE, IN DRAWN WORK. 



65 



This work is far more quickly accomplished than the ordinary 
drawn-work, and is not trying to the eyes. The white linen floss 




Corner, in Swedish Drawn-work. 

washes beautifully, too, and has all the lustre of silk. Scarfs, centre- 
pieces, etc., are made in this work, always with the utmost satisfac- 
tion and pleasure. 



SQUARE, IN DRAWN-WORK. 

[Contributed by Mrs. S. S. Peniston, Andalusia, Pa. J 

Materials: Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 150, 3-cord, 200- 
yards spools, and a square of very fine linen. 



66 barbour's prize needle -work series. 

The stitches are so plainly given that no description is necessary. 
One-quarter of the square is shown, reduced about two-thirds, but 




Square, in Drawn- Work. 

may be enlarged as one likes. Many think that threads must be 
counted, in drawing, but if one tries measuring instead much time 
and care will be saved. 

FIVE O'CLOCK TEA-CLOTH WITH CUT-WORK 

BORDER. 

[Contributed by Mrs. Chas. M. D. Kay, Elliot House, Toronto, Canada.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 50, 3-cord, 200-yards 
spools, and fine butcher's linen, 1 % yards square. The Ulster etch- 



FIVE O'CLOCK TEA-CLOTH WITH CUT-WORK BORDER. 67 

ing flax, or white flossette, size i, may be used for the filling-stitches 
with excellent effect. 

Buttonhole all lines save the veining of the large leaves, which is 
done in outline stitch. It is an excellent plan, when this can be 
done, to cut away the linen and fold back to the line which is to be 






tM 



if^m- 



i ^ 



^&m 







Five O'clock Tea-cloth with Cut-work Border. 



buttonholed over, as described in the Danish antique work, appear- 
ing in No. 4, No. 5, and No. 6 of the Prize Needlework Series. 
Otherwise, when the buttonholing is completed, cut the linen as 



68 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

close as possible without clipping the stitches. Buttonhole the edge 
of the centre all around and fill in the spiders and twisted bars. A 
simple but rich and effective design. 



SQUARE, IN ROMAN EMBROIDERY. 

[Contributed by Julta D. Smith, Box 159, West Med way, Mass.j 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 50, 3 -cord, 200-yards 
spools, and 1 i-inch square of firm butcher's linen. Finer thread and 
linen may be used if preferred. 




Square, in Roman Embroidery. 

Trace or stamp the design on the linen, and buttonhole the lines 
closely. The surface stitches are simple but effective, being the 
loop or "bird's-eye" stitch, with which all are familiar. Push the 
needle up through the fabric, then down again in the same place, 
leaving a loop of requisite length, — say, for this purpose, ]/ x to y$ 
inch. Bring the needle up at tip of loop, pass it over the thread and 



SAILOR COLLAR, IN ROMAN EMBROIDERY. 



69 



down on the other side, thus making a short stitch to hold the loop 
in place. In the corner leaves 3 of these loops start from a central 
point, in the side scrolls they are single. Barbour's Ulster etching 
flax, cream or white, is used for this work with beautiful effect. 



SAILOR COLLAR, IN ROMAN EMBROIDERY. 

[Contributed by Mrs. F. P. Bernard, Warren, Minn.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 50, 3 -cord, 200-yards 
spools, and Yz yard linen of suitable quality. If preferred, Bar- 




Sailor Collar, in Roman Embroidery. 



bour's Ulster etching flax or linen embroidery floss No. 5 for finer 
work may be used instead of the thread. 

Procure a sailor collar of size desired,, — that given is large enough 
for the average child of five years, — fasten the linen to a board 
with a few pins, place the pattern on this and mark around the 
edges. Cut a link from some stiff paper, i-^f X i}& inches, mak- 
ing the opening same width as one side of link, 3/% inch. The 
smaller links are 1^ X % inch, proportioned like the larger 



70 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

ones, the anchors 3^ inches long, and stars ij^ inches from point 
to point. With the large link pattern begin at the neck and work 
down to point in front, and around to centre of back ; then begin 
on other side and work around to centre of back in same way, 
then add the centre links in back of collar, top and bottom. Lay 
on the star pattern, mark edges and centres, — 5/% inch, — then 
the anchors and the small chains. After the lines are all properly 
marked, trace with a coarse doubled thread, put in the lace-stitches, 
buttonhole all edges, wash, press dry, and carefully cut out the linen. 
If you wish your work to look well, do not rub it when washing, but 
press the dirt out. To iron, have four thicknesses of woolen under 
the ironing sheet, place the collar right side down, pull into shape, 
and iron under thin white cloth. After marking out the links it is 
well to erase the cross lines not intended to be worked, so that no 
mistake will be made. 



WORK BAG. 

[Contributed by Satie J. Campin, Orlando, Florida.] 

Materials : Barbour's Ulster etching flax, 2 skeins shade 2, 1 
skein each shade ^, 20, and 21, and 1 skein Ulster rope linen, shade 
2, with 2 yards No. 2 ribbon, yellow satin, or in accordance with 
the colors of the floss if other style of decoration is chosen. For 
the foundation use heavy linen or duck. 

Take a strip of the fabric n x 21 inches, turn a hem at top 2^ 
inches wide; take a strip 3^ X 38 inches, for the pockets, turn }4 
inch hem ; pin this at bottom of wide strip, and between it and the 
top sketch or stamp sprays of buttercups (or any small flowers), 
working these in Kensington stitch, shade No. 21 for stems and 
veining of leaves, No. 20 for leaves and French knots in centres of 
buttercups, and shades No. y 2 and 2 for the flowers. Press and rip 
the hem at each end, sew these up so it will be finished when the 
hem is folded back, make a row of featherstitching at foot of hem, 
using shade No. 2, and another row an inch above, making space 
to run ribbon in ; double the bag, cut a buttonhole in the middle, 
between the rows of featherstitching, perpendicular, and on outside 



TABLE COVER. 



71 



only, and another on each side of the seam, and run the ribbon in 
from each side, making the draw-strings. Work the edge of the 
hem on the long strip as the other, mark the bag in 3-inch spaces 
at the bottom, seam the 
ends of the narrow strip 
and baste on to form 
pockets, laying a box 
pleat in the centre of 
each ; baste down between 
the pockets, and feather- 
stitch, Take 2 rounds of 
pasteboard 7 inches in 
diameter, cover one side 
of each with the goods 
and sew together, turn in 
lower edge of bag and 
join to this, twist a cord 
of the Ulster rope linen, 
shade No. 2, to cover this 
joining, and you have as 
pretty a bag as any one 
could wish. The etching 
flax is very nice to work 
with, having the same 
gloss as silk, and filling 

in so much faster than the fine filo. Any colors liked may be 
used, always doing the featherstitching with the darkest shade in the 
flowers, and having the ribbon to match. A cross-stitch embroidery 
would be very pretty for this. These bags sell very readily at fairs, 
and are nice and useful holiday gifts. 




Work Bag. 



TABLE COVER. 

Materials: Barbour's rope linen, size 00, 7 skeins No. 155, 8 of 
No. 153, and 3 each of No. }4 and No. 40, with a yard square of 
heavy linen, unbleached, and pattern stamped or traced. 



72 



HARBOURS PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 



This design is very rich and effective. Any colors may be chosen 
for the work, to harmonize with the furnishings of the room where it 
is to be used. Shades of green and terra-cotta would be specially 
effective. 



%l 



-..A 



Jlu Wftta 






4 



m 



m 

4 



©Ft 







sr 




Table Cover. 



The Ulster rope linen has all the effect of silk, is much less 
expensive, and far more durable, as it does not roughen and wear off 
with use. Hence it is especially recommended for real service. 



CENTRE-PIECE AND DOILIES 



COLONIAL DESIGN. 



CENTRE-PIECE AND DOILIES — COLONIAL DESIGN. 

[Contributed by Mrs. Sarah J. G. Solley, Deerfield, Mass.] 

Materials : Barbour's Ulster etching flax, blue, 3 shades, 23-inch 
square art linen for centre-piece, 6-inch hemstitched squares for 
doilies. For hemstitching use No. 150 Barbour's Irish flax thread. 

The stitches used are simple catstitch, outline, seed, satin, 
feather, Queen Anne, French knot, etc., and any preferred combi- 
nation may be affected. 










% 



0£7 



Centre-piece. 



The designs are such as were used by Colonial dames in the long 
ago in a great variety of decoration, before stamping and transfer 
patterns were thought of. In their origination or adaptation there 



74 



barboitr's prize needle-work series, 



is opportunity for the display of individual talent, and the study is 
most interesting. Each design as worked may be sketched with the 




Doilies. 



pencil, care being taken to produce a general harmony of effect ; 
and the work is not confined to doilies and centre-pieces, but is 
especially adapted to the decoration of large pieces, such as counter- 
panes, table-covers, etc., using the Ulster rope linen for the heavier 
embroidery, and No. 8 floss for very fine work. 

Any arrangement of stitches is permissible, and in their variation 
and the origination of new and quaint designs the interested needle- 
worker will find a source of continued interest and pleasure. 



SOFA-PILLOW IN OUTLINE 



75 



SOFA-PILLOW, IN OUTLINE AND CROSS-STITCH 

EMBROIDERY. 

[Contributed by Julia D. Smith, Box 159, W. Medvvay, Mass.] 

Materials : Barbour's Ulster rope linen, shades Nos. 151, 153, and 
155, 2 skeins each, with square of ecru canvas having design 
stamped or traced. If preferred to the cord, the edge may be fin- 
ished with a frill of ribbon or china silk, matching either shade of 
floss. 



|ii «|| i ^ k ^^ ' ^^^ 




Sofa-Pillow in Outline and Cross-Stitch Embroidery. 



/b BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 

Other shades of floss may be chosen, in harmony with the furnish- 
ings of the room. Shades Nos. 43, 121, and 122, used together, are 
very effective, or shades Nos. 131, 132, and 136. 



SOFA PILLOW. 

[Contributed by Miss A. M. Fitch, 5S Olive Street, New Haven, Conn.] 

Materials: Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 25, 3-cord, 200-yards 
spools, white star flossette, size *, a piece of rick-rack braid, and 




Sofa Pillow. 






FLEUR-DE-LIS DOILY. 77 



square of denim, any preferred color. For tacking on the braid 
use the spool linen, taking a stitch in every point. The fancy 
stitches are done with the flossette, and may be varied to suit the 
taste of the worker. Around the braid on the outer edge of design 
is a row of buttonhole stitches, short and long alternating. The 
half-ovals in the corners are outlined with featherstitching, the 
lower being filled with honeycomb stitch — an open buttonhole 
stitch caught into loop of preceding row — and surrounded by 
" rays," in satin-stitch. The bars or spokes extending toward the 
centre from the inner row of rick-rack are simple chain-stitch, and 
the combination, while of the plainest description as to stitches, is 
greatly admired. It may be utilized on nearly any design for sofa 
pillows and table-covers in colored denim, or on white linen for 
table service, with most satisfactory results. The model is all in 
white, but if preferred the Ulster rope linen in colors may be used 
in one or more shades, combined with the rick-rack, and if a heavier 
effect is desired the Ulster braid may be substituted for this with 
great satisfaction. The making of pillows has no end, and many 
simple, charming designs are easily evolved if one has at hand suit- 
able material, with the Ulster rope linen. Work done with this 
floss is serviceable as well as pretty. Another pillow easily made was 
on red and white checked gingham, the red crossed with white, 
lined with denim of red and white mixed, the ruffle hem being turned 
over from the wrong side and feather-stitched with white. Still 
another was of denim, checked off in inch spaces diagonally (be- 
ginning at a corner), these lines outlined in plain or knotted stitch 
(see page 73, Barbour's Prize Needlework Series, No. 6), and a little 
star of crossed threads put in the intersections. For these stars 
different colors may be used with good effect, serving to use up any 
odd bits of the rope linen floss you may have remaining from various 
pieces of work. 

FLEUR-DE-LIS DOILY. 

[Contributed by Miss Alice Luka, Van Deusen, Mass.] 

Materials : Barbour's Ulster etching flax, 2 skeins each shade No. 
I 5 1 ? I 53? an d i54> and 1 skein No. 156, with square of linen 13 
X 13 inches. 



78 



bakbour's prize needle-work series. 



Trace or stamp the pattern. Buttonhole the point of the fleur- 
de-lis with shade No. 151, outlining remainder, and filling in with 









Fleur-de-Lis Doily. 



any fancy stitches that may suggest themselves. The leaves of 
alternate figures are treated in the same way, with No. 153 and 
154, and the bands are of No. 156. This piece is easily made, and 
has been greatly admired. 



SQUARE FOR SMALL TABLE. 

[Contributed by Miss Ellen Muller, New York, N.Y.] 

Materials : Barbour's Ulster etching flax, 2 skeins each shade 
Nos. 52 and 53, and square of rather heavy linen 16 x 16 inches. 
Any shades that are liked may be chosen instead of those given. 






SQUARE FOR SMALL TABLE 



79 



Allowing J4 i ncn f° r the hem, draw ^ inch 1% inches from the 
edge, miss yi inch, draw j£ inch. Hemstitch this with No. 52, 
crossing the thread over the plain space as it is carried from one 
side to the other in taking up the threads. This method of hem- 
stitching with color is very effective. The embroidery is done with 
outline, satin, feather, bird's-eye, cross-stitch, etc., and any fancy 



§m 











\i%\i'k'ik 



Square for Small Table. 



stitches may be introduced that, according to the worker's idea, 
will add to the effect sought. While apparently elaborate, this work 
is very simple and offers opportunity for much originality. 



80 



barbour's prize needle-work series, 



SOFA PILLOW. 

[Contributed by Miss C. B. Fitch, 5S Olive Street, New Haven, Conn.] 

Materials : Barbour's white nossette, size **, new Ulster braid, and 
square of denim, i8x 18 inches, or size desired. 




Sofa Pillow. 



Block off the denim in squares of 3 inches, basting on the braid. 
To fasten, in every 3d loop on the edge of the braid make 2 short 
stitches, with a long stitch between, using the white flossette for this 
purpose. The effect is in every way equal to silk, and it is far more 



CENTRE-PIECE, IN CROSS-STITCH. 81 

suitable for such use. The design in the centre of each square is 
made by using a ring of the flossette, winding it 8 or 10 times 
around a small cork y 2 inch in diameter, and buttonholing over the 
loop closely all around. In the centre of each ring is a star of 
crossed threads, and at even distances around it groups of 5 stitches, 
graduated in length. The ruffle is finished with a row of buttonhole 
or blanket stitches, 2 short, % inch apart, then 3 as described in 
applying the braid. The whole effect, although so simple a design, 
is very charming. 

The same idea may be carried out as a border for a table-cover, 
scarf, portiere, etc., making a row of squares all around, with blocks 
in the corners, or as liked. It is effective, not only on colored 
denims, but on white linen. 

If preferred, the ruffle of the pillow may be edged with the 
braid, applied as described. Other designs, such as are suitable for 
centre-pieces of braid, may be used instead of the simple blocking. 
On page 72, book No. 6 of Barbour's Prize Needlework Series, is a 
Russian centre-piece, the single figures of which are extremely 
unique applied to the centre of such a pillow. 



CENTRE-PIECE, IN CROSS-STITCH. 

[Contributed by IIattie D. Rockwell, 44 Thwing Street, Boston, Mass.] 

Materials : Barbour's Ulster etching flax, light, medium, and dark 
blue, or as shown in illustration, " Deerfield " shades, 2 skeins light, 
1 skein each medium and dark, and pattern stamped on 12-inch 
square of round-thread linen. 

Use the light shade for buttonholing the edge, the dark for the 
single crosses, or outline of the pattern, and the medium for the 
remainder. Or vary this arrangement in any way to suit the taste. 
Other colors may be chosen instead of the blue. Shades No. 70, 
No. 71, and No. 20 combine beautifully, also shades No. 30, No. 
30^, and No. 82. This class of work is much more artistic than 
Kensington embroidery, unless properly done, and the merest novice 
in needlework will be able to make an entire success of it. Odds 



82 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES, 



and ends of the Ulster etching flax may be used very effectively in 
cross-stitching, care being taken to combine the colors harmoni- 















^ 






■K$ft& 



tw^#^ 



!w:» 










Centre-piece, in Cross-stitch. 

ously. This embroidery material will be found lustrous, durable, 
and far less expensive than silk. 



PHOTOGRAPH FRAMES. 

[Contributed by Miss M. C Parsons, 526 State Street, Hudson, N.Y.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread No. 90, with No. 50 for 
rings, 3 -cord, 200-yards spools, 8 yards linen braid, 5 yards purling, 
and y 2 yard yellow satin. 



PHOTOGRAPH FRAME, 



83 



For the larger frame cut a piece of heavy pasteboard, 8}4 X 10 
inches, cut an oval opening in the centre 4^ X 3% inches, place 
over one side a layer of wadding, cover with satin, and glue down 
well at the back. For the opening, cut the satin out toward the 
edge and fold to the back smoothly. For the back cut a piece of 
pasteboard }( inch smaller all around, cover with the satin, or with 




Photograph Frame. 



cotton surah of same shade, and fasten firmly to the front all around, 
leaving space to slip the picture in at top or bottom. Attach to 
the back a strip of heavy pasteboard, covered, as a standard, or a 



84 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES, 



wire support, if preferred. When complete, the bit of lace is 
fastened in place, caught on with slight stitches so as to be readily 
removed. For this 4^ yards of braid are required. 




Photograph Frame. 



The smaller frame is, outside, 8x8 inches, but may be made 
longer than wide if preferred. Cut the oblong opening 3^ X 2^ 
inches. Take j£ yard of satin, cut lengthwise, join ends, and fasten 
around inner and outer edges, having most of the fulness come at 
the corners. Tack this to form puffs, finish as directed for larger 
frame, and fasten the lace square lightly in place ; 3^ yards of 






CURTAINS, WITH RENAISSANCE LACE AND INSERTION. 85 

braid for this, 12 small rings and 4 larger ones. For the large 
frame, 4 small rings, 12 of next size, and 2 of next are wanted. 
Any pretty designs for doilies may be utilized in making these 
frames, and when one tires of them they may be again put to the origi- 
nal purpose. They are quickly made, and sell wonderfully well at 
bazaars, where "something new" is always the demand. Let me 
say that Barbour's Irish flax thread No. 90 is used by me for fine 
Renaissance or Battenburg lace-work in preference to any other 
make. 



CURTAINS, WITH RENAISSANCE LACE AND INSERTION. 

[Contributed by Mrs. H. D. Plant, 130 Van Buren Street, Brooklyn, N.Y.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, 20 spools No. 50 and 8 
spools of No. 25, 3-cord, 200-yards spools, 108 yards of wide 
hemstitch braid, and 432 yards of narrow, with 14 yards of linen 
scrim. 

This design is entirely original, and very rich in effect. The ma- 
terials given are for two pairs of curtains. No. 25 thread is used 
for making the rings, 3,000 in number, the larger ones wound over 
a smooth stick $/% inch in diameter, the smaller ones over a pencil. 
There is no difficulty in making rings rapidly and well, and the 
effect is far superior to that given by the rings which are purchased 
ready-made. No. 50 thread is used for whipping the braid and for 
the filling stitches. 

The edge of curtains is composed of two leaves filled in with 
point de Venise and point de Bruxelles. The circular figures are 
made with a ring in the centre, fastened with plain twisted (Sor- 
rento) bars, and the spaces between are filled with spiders. The 
edge is 3 inches in width, and the wide braid is used on the straight 
side. 

The insertion is 10 inches wide, or nearly so, and corresponds 
with the edge, the five upper leaves of the main figure being filled 
alternately with the same stitches, which may, of course, be varied 
and made more or less elaborate to please one's fancy. The scrolls 



86 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES, 




Curtains, with Renaissance Lace and Insertion. 



INFANT S PILLOW. 87 

on each side are filled with 9 rings and plain cross-stitch ; inside 
the scrolls are two figures composed of five circles, each filled with 
bars fastened in the centre with a buttonhole stitch. All other 
spaces are filled with spiders varying in size to fit the space. 

On either side of the scroll figure is a band designed to make the 
curtain hang straight and prevent the sagging which is so often seen 
in draperies made with this work. This is worked with rings and 
fastened with bars. 

The simple drawn-work insertion adds to the beauty of this 
design. This is so easy as to need no description. The rows of 
double-hemstitching are y 2 inch in width, requiring the drawing of 
8 or 10 threads, the wheel pattern twice that width. The threads 
are knotted in clusters of 4 threads each, 6 of these being drawn 
together with a wheel darned around, using for this 4 threads drawn 
from the scrim. 

In conclusion, I am sure no lady will have any difficulty in follow- 
ing this design, having a section of the pattern in lace and insertion 
with the corner ; and I may add that having used Barbour's Irish flax 
thread for this class of work, no one will take any other. It is not 
only less expensive than the so-called Battenburg thread, but vastly 
superior. 



INFANT'S PILLOW. 

[Contributed by Mrs. Gwen Keys, 1103 Corning- Street, Red Oak, Iowa.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 80, 3-cord, 200-yards 
spools, white, ^ yard fine lawn, 2 yards honiton leaf braid, medium 
size, and 10 yards baby ribbon, color desired. 

The pillow, without ruffle, is 14 x n inches, and the ruffle is 2^ 
inches deep. Trace the design for embroidery, and baste on the 
medallions carefully, then buttonhole around each with the thread, 
1 long and 2 short st. Cut the lawn from beneath the braid, 
taking care not to clip the embroidery. Finish the ruffle for each 
side separately, making a narrow hem, hemstitched with the thread, 
then draw enough threads above the hem to run the ribbon in. 
The ruffle should be full enough to go twice across before it is 



88 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 



gathered. The ends are tapered to each corner, the ribbon run 
through spaces and made in a bow at corners, and the cushion 




mmtmirtmmmm 







Infant's Pi Ik 



should match the ribbon in color. The model is pink, but blue or 
lavender would be very pretty. If preferred, the Ulster etching flax 
may be used for the buttonholing. This has a lustre equal to silk, 
and washes well. The thread, however, is delicate in appearance, 
and also lustrous. 



RUSSIAN CENTRE-PIECE. 



89 



RUSSIAN CENTRE-PIECE. 

[Contributed by Mrs. Hedvig Muller, New York, N.Y.] 

Materials : Three spools Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 35, 3-cord, 
200-yards spools, 1 spool No. 100 same linen, for whipping curves, 
16-inch square of linen, and 24 yards new Ulster braid. 




Russian Centre-piece, 



The design and stitches are so clearly shown as to require no 
further explanation. The centre-piece, complete, is 22 inches 



90 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 



square, and an extremely effective bit of work. This braid, of pure 
linen with a cord running through the centre, is very ornamental in 
itself, and only the simplest stitches are required to bring it out. A 
pattern in which the braid need not be turned is necessary, but very 
many Battenburg patterns may be adapted to it, and some especially 
beautiful designs have appeared in previous books. Hold the braid 
firmly to the pattern with the thumb and forefinger of one hand, 
shaping it to the angle or curve with the other, then baste securely 
in place. 



YOKE, IN RENAISSANCE LACE. 

[Contributed by Mrs. W. M. Weeks, Lyndonville, Vermont.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. ioo and No. 60, 3- 
cord, 200-yards spools, with 7 yards of linen hemstitch braid, cream, 
gray, or white, as preferred. 




Yoke, in Renaissance Lace. 



LADY S CORSAGE COLLAR, 



91 



The design is a simple but very effective one, intended for the 
front of a dress-yoke. It may be duplicated for the back, if de- 
sired, and the two leaves, five-petalled, at the sides used for collar 
ornaments with fine effect. The stitches are not elaborate, and re- 
quire no description. Ladies will find Barbour's Irish flax thread 
as superior for this class of lace-making as for others. 



LADY'S CORSAGE COLLAR. 

[Contributed by Luella C Holzapfel, Oklahoma City, Okla.] 

Materials : Two spools Barbour's Irish flax lace thread, No. 250, 
2-cord, 200-yards spools (or No. 150, if preferred), 36 yards plain 
point lace braid, and 5 yards purling. 




Lady's Corsage Collar. 

Follow directions given in No. 6 for basting braid, etc. In the 
model, the fan lace-stitch is used as a ground-work, but this may 
very effectively be chosen as a filling-in stitch for the design, the 
ground-work being more open. The collar fastens on left shoulder, 
the points reaching the waist-line at front and back, and the square 
tabs falling over the shoulders. 



92 



BARBOUR'S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 



DRESSER SCARF, IN ROYAL BATTENBURG. 

[Contributed by Jessie D. Roedel, 441 Cumberland Street, Lebanon, Pa.] 

Materials: Barbour's Irish flax thread, i spool No. 150, 3 spools 
No. 100, and 2 spools No. 80, 3-cord, 200-yards spools, 26 yards of 




Dresser Scarf. 



POINT LACE HANDKERCHIEFS. 93 

linen hemstitch braid, 5 yards of purling, and a strip of linen, length 
and width desired for dresser, say 18 x 45 inches. Hemstitch this 
1 inch wide on one edge. Stitches are much the same as described 
in "Square with Battenburg Lace/' page 85, No. 6. This scarf may 
be lengthened by adding another side figure, and the design is very 
handsome used as a border for tea-cloth. As a lace-worker of many 
years, my testimony in regard to the excellence of Barbour's Irish flax 
thread, for lace-making, may not be without value. Having used 
this thread in every branch of the work, I can heartily recommend 
it. In this piece use No. 150 for hemstitching the fabric and for 
whipping curves, felling angles, etc., No. 100 for the groundwork of 
Venetian bars, also for the closest filling stitches, and No. 80 for 
rosette (point d'Angleterre) stitch, and others similar. 



POINT LACE HANDKERCHIEFS. 

HANDKERCHIEF NO. I. 
[Contributed by Mrs. J. Moore, Stoug-hton, Mass.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax lace thread, No. 250, 2 -cord, 200- 
yards spools, 7 yards purling, 1 yard each of two fancy braids, and 
J4 yard honiton medallion. 

The purling is used to render dainty work, and the whole should 
be done with the No. 250 thread, which is smooth, lustrous, and 
strong enough to make good, durable work. After the purling is 
whipped to fit the pattern perfectly, the circles are filled with 
" spider-web " stitch, for which directions are accurately given in 
No. 5 and No. 6 of Barbour's Prize Needlework Series. The plain 
row of braid next the edge is joined with point d'Anvers stitch. The 
filling is in imitation of real fish-net, and is done double, the thread 
being stretched as evenly as possible from point to point and 
twisted back ; this runs, all one way. Stretch threads across these 
to form perfect squares, and in twisting back make 3 twists between 
crossings and fasten with 3 buttonhole stitches drawn tight enough 
to form a strong knot. Finish the edge with another row of purling. 
I find if the purling is held from right to left and the needle carried 



94 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 




Point Lace Handkerchiefs. 



POINT LACE HANDKERCHIEFS. 95 

a little aslant towards the left, catching enough of the purling, it 
does not require whipping, and time is saved. As a teacher and 
lace-maker of many years' experience, I wish to say that Barbour's 
Irish flax threads are the most satisfactory I ever used. For line 
work No. 250 cannot be excelled, whether for lace work or very 
dainty plain sewing ; for hemming or hemstitching fine lawn it cannot 
be excelled. 



HANDKERCHIEF NO. 2. 
[Contributed by Katharine G. Grove, Lancaster, Pa.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax lace thread, No. 250, 2 -cord, 200- 
yards spools, 3^ yards plain point lace braid, 1 yard purling, and 
1 2 -inch square of fine linen lawn. 

Only a corner pattern is needed. Baste braid and proceed with 
stitches as directed in Book No. 6. The sides of the square are 
hemstitched, and the lace-corners neatly felled in place. The 
design is very simple and easy of accomplishment, yet the effect is 
decidedly charming as well as novel. 



HANDKERCHIEFS NOS. 3 AND 4. 
[Contributed by Mrs. L. A. Thompson, 2512 Irving- Street, Denver, Col.] 

Materials for No. 3 : One spool Barbour's Irish flax lace thread, 
No. 250, 2-cord, 200-yards spools, 7 yards plain point lace braid, 2 
yards purling, j4 yard honiton medallions, and 12 -inch square of 
linen lawn. Materials for No. 4 are the same, omitting the me- 
dallions, and using one yard more of point lace braid. 

These designs, while as dainty in effect as can be imagined, are 
very simple, and a pattern may be easily made from the illustrations. 
The stitches are of the plainest description, consisting of twisted or 
Sorrento bars, " spiders " and, in the corner spaces of No. 3, plain 
buttonhole stitch, or point de Bruxelles. The corner of the latter 
handkerchief makes a beautiful collar-point. 

I wish to urge all ladies who make fine laces to try the new lace 
thread, No. 250. It works beautifully, and having tested its merits 
I am sure its use will be continued. 



96 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 




Renaissance Lace Centre-piece. 



RENAISSANCE LACE CENTRE-PIECE. 

[Contributed by Miss M. C. Parsons, Hudson, N.Y.] 

Materials : Six spools Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 50, 3 -cord, 
200-yards spools, 18 yards linen hemstitch braid, 4 yards purling, 
and 6-inch square of linen for centre. 

Make the rings by winding thread 10 times around a pencil and 
buttonholing over. The design is not intricate, and the stitches are 
very simple, composed entirely of twisted bars and plain wheels, yet 
the effect is very lovely. The centre, leaving off the first straight row 
of braid with remainder of pattern, makes a very pretty little doily. 



POINT LACE FAX 



97 



POINT LACE FAN. 

[Contributed by Ella Bottorff, Corydon, Indiana.] 

Materials : Barbour's new Irish flax lace thread, No. 250, 2 -cord, 
200-yards spools, 11 yards of plain point lace braid, and 2 yards of 
purling. 

The border alone makes a lovely edge for handkerchief, and the 
entire design, omitting the ends of border, may be duplicated to 
form a doily, having a linen centre. Medallions formed of the 




Point Lace Fan 



narrow braid, as shown, and filled with lace-stitches, are much more 
effective than medallions which are purchased by the yard. The 
filling stitches are varied, and Raleigh bars are used as a ground- 
work throughout, giving the work an exquisitely dainty while sub- 
stantial crisp appearance. For such lace-making the new lace thread 
referred to cannot be surpassed. 



98 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 



DRESS FRONT, IN BATTENBURG LACE. 

[Contributed by Miss Flora Kingsley, Mansfield, Pa.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax 
thread, i spool each of Np. ioo 
and No. 150, and 6 yards of 
linen hemstitch braid, narrow 
width. 

Use No. 150 for whipping 
curves and felling angles, and 
No. 100 for rings and lace- 
stitches. For the rings, wind 
thread 6 times around a pencil, 
slip off, and buttonhole over. 
The stitches are so clearly shown 
that no description is necessary, 
particularly as this has been 
given in No. 5 and No. 6. The 
loop, between groups of 3 rings, 
is filled with cloth or darning 
stitch and the space just above 
with plain point de Bruselles. 
Outside this are the buttonhole 
or Raleigh bars, and below the 
net stitch, which is especially ef- 
fective for large spaces. Carry 

the thread from point to point 
across, at even distances, and all 
one way, twisting back on each 
thread and whipping along the 
edge of the braid to next point ; 
Y^ inch is a good distance for 
ordinary work. 

As a lace-maker of much ex- 
perience, I may say that I con- 
sider Barbour's Irish flax threads, 
in the various numbers, superior 
for this work. 

Dress Front, in Battenburg Lace. 




ROSE DOILY. 



99 




Rose Doily. 

ROSE DOILY. 

[Contributed by Ermelinda C. Noble, Anniston, Ala.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax lace thread, No. 250, 2 -cord, 
200-yards spools, 7 yards plain point lace braid, ij^ yards purling, 
and 5 -inch, square of fine linen lawn. 

Description of work is unnecessary, as full directions have so 
often been given in the Prize Needlework Series, notably in Nos. 5 



100 



barbour's prize needle-work series. 



and 6. This design may be adapted very readily to a handker- 
chief by adding one or more side figures, according" to size desired. 
For use as a doily, many will prefer to use Barbour's Irish flax 
thread, No. 150, 3-cord, 200-yards spools. No. 250 is about equal 
to the ordinary No. 1200 thread, but is a pure linen and works 
beautifully. This doily is extremely dainty, and suitable for holding 
a rose-bowl especially. 



HANDKERCHIEF, IN THREAD LACE. 

[Contributed by Mrs. Mary J. Clarke, 1408 E. Spruce Street, Seattle, Wash.] 




Handkerchief, in Thread Lace. 



RENAISSANCE CENTRE-PIECE. 101 

Materials: Two spools Barbour's Irish flax lace thread, No. 250, 
2 -cord, 200-yards spools, 1 spool No. 120 Irish flax thread, 3-cord, 
200-yards spools, 5 -inch square of linen lawn, and crochet hook, 
size 000. 

Draw the design on tracing linen, or procure the stamped pat- 
tern, if preferred, hem the linen narrowly and baste in centre of 
pattern, crochet 24 yards of chain, using the No. 120 linen for this, 
baste this firmly on the design, and fill in with lace-stitches, as 
shown, or any others that are liked. If preferred, braid may be 
used instead of the crocheted cord, but I am sure that any who try 
this method will be pleased. It is real thread lace, and has a 
dainty crispness hard to imitate. Any figures may be traced, out- 
lined with the cord and filled in, then applied to collars, handker- 
chief borders, etc. 



RENAISSANCE CENTRE-PIECE. 

[Contributed by Mrs. W. E. Scott, 270 W. 119th Street, New York, N.Y.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 50, 3-cord, 200-yards 
spools, and 10 yards linen hemstitch braid. Six spools of thread 
will be sufficient for rings and work. 

Follow directions given in No. 6 Book for basting braid, whipping 
curves, etc. For the large rings, 32 in number, wind thread 20 
times around a stick y 2 inch in diameter, slip off, and buttonhole 
over; for the smaller rings use a pencil, and wind 12 times. The 
bars are heavier than usual, the thread being carried twice across, 
and twisted over closely. The ordinary tc in crocheting may be 
used, putting thread ever as many times as length of space demands. 
Crocheted and tatted wheels are used most effectively in this class of 
work, either in coarse or fine thread. Other stitches require no de- 
scription. The purling is crocheted : Fasten in a picot of braid, 
* ch'3, miss 2, 1 dc in next picot, and repeat. Next row is the 
same, fastening under 3 ch of previous row. This purling is effective 
and very durable. 

The large rings are finished with a tiny spider, woven over crossed 
threads, in the centre. These rings may be purchased, or are easily 
made, and are very rich looking. Fasten the thread in at one side, 



102 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 



pushing the needle straight through the ring, twist back, push the 
needle through and bring it out % the space from last fastening, 
carry it across the first thread, passing between the twists, fasten 
opposite, twist back to the centre, make a small wheel or spider 




Renaissance Centre-piece. 

by weaving the thread around the crossed threads two or three times, 
then twist out on the single thread to the edge of the ring and fasten. 
Let me say that, when making spiders or other woven stitches, it is 
a good plan to hold them down tight with the thumb when drawing 
up the thread, in order to keep them flat, or prevent them pucker- 
ing or " bunching up." 



Ask for 

Barbour's 



Established 
J784. 



It is the best for all uses* 
Insist upon having it* 
Sold everywhere* 

See that the threads you purchase bear labels similar to the following. 
THEY ARE STANDARD. 



3 -CORD 200 YARDS SPOOL THREAD. 




TOP LABEL. 



COLORS* 

Grey, White & Ecru, 
J Oz. Balls, 



IN 



DARK BLUE, for strong Sewing 
WHITE, ) For 



! WD. BROWN, \ Lace Making | 

(Ecru.) 



DRABS, 



and 
Needlework. 




BALL THREAD. 




REVERSE LABEL. 



LINEN FLOSSES 
In all the Art Shades. 



■U"LSTEE 

ROPE LINEN FLOSS. 

The Barbour Brothers Co. 

NEW YORK. 



SlZEOO 
SHADE 

N°3 



Size 00, "Rope," Medium. 

44 4, "Etching," Fine. 
"White Flossette, * ** *** **** 



SIZES. 

Nos. J6 to 70. 
(No. 70 Fine Size.) 



BARBOUR'S STANDARD 
3-Cord Carpet Thread. 

| BARBOURS' IRISH FLAX. % 

IN ALL COLORS. 



Fine to Coarse. 



Ask for 

Barbour's 



Established J784. 




Barbour's 

Irish Flax 

Threads 



Are made for every branch of trade, and for 
every purpose where Linen Threads are used. 

They are specially adapted and are standard and the best for all kinds 
of hand sewing and machine work. 



LINEN THREADS SPECIALLY MADE FOR 

Boot and Shoe Making, 
Clothing Manufacturers, 
Carpet Sewing, 



Harness and Saddlery Making, * 
Book Binding, 
Glove Making, 
Fish Nets. 



¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 



For Strength and Durability 

BARBOUR'S 

IRISH LINEN THREAD 

Is the best for all uses. 

Received Highest Awards at 
World's Fair ^ Chicago ■, 1893. 

Special Merits. 
Distinguished Excellence* 
Uniformity* 
Strength* 
Adaptability* 
Durability* 



Barbour's Threads receive Highest Awards wherever exhibited. 



Spool, Ball, and Skein Threads 

IN 

ALL 

COLORS 

For all kinds of coarse, strong sewing, and fine stitching, and for every kind 
of Art Needlework with Linen. 

For sale by all wholesale dry goods jobbing houses, shoe findings and 
saddlery hardware dealers throughout the country. 

At retail by all small-ware dealers, general stores, carpet houses, and shoe 
findings dealers. Ask for 

BARBOUR'S 



I 



Barbour's 



Ulster Rope 
Linen Floss 



is continually and rapidly advancing in popularity as its perfect adaptability to the 
varied uses of expensive silks becomes more strongly attested. Its smoothness and 
lustre is unsurpassed. It is especially adapted for Embroidery, for the decoration 
of a thousand and one articles for home use and adornment, and with equally 
as charming effect can be applied as readily to the uses of Knotting, Netting, 
Knitting, Crocheting, and kindred arts. For Slippers, Mittens, Purses, etc., 
it is durable, lustrous, firm, and far less expensive than silk, and its sale in 
this new field is constantly increasing. 

75 shades are now on the market, including the Newest Art Shades, and 
the old favorites; others will be added as approved. 



¥ ¥ 

J Ask J 

y your * 

$ Dealer for BarboU^S ? 

¥ ¥ 

I Ulster Rope Linen Floss % 

¥ ¥ 

¥ ¥ 
¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥ 



To Wash 



Make a light suds with Ivor}' or other pure soap, and 



Tr*mV\*r\kAc>r\T (particularly for the first laundering) cool water. Wash 

* one article at a time, finishing with this before taking 

another. Do not rub the embroidery, or put soap directly upon it. Rinse 

carefully and quickly in clear, cold water, to which a little salt may be added. 

After rinsing, place between two thick towels, or in one which may be folded 

over, roll up. squeeze (in order to extract the moisture), 

then unroll, place right side down on a soft cloth or flannel Art Embroidery 

folded in several thicknesses, lay a white cloth over the m JS* ■* gashed 
., , .. , . , , . , with great care 

wrong side, and press until dry with a moderately hot iron. 



STERLING & FRANCINE CLARK ART INSTITUTE 



GIVES 






Aii 



Strong Linen Sewii 

Satisfactory 

Results 



3 1962 00079 5595 

A a y^ 



1 SEE et 

1] That all 

€<| Your 

.#J Linen Thread 

1] carries this 

%< Trade Mark. 



carries this ~**pS*^ 




******* ************************ 



* For Fine 
J Lace Making 



^aler for 



* 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 



te, 200 Yds. : 

¥ 
Numbers * 

100-120-150-250 } 

¥ 
************** 



rs 

Rope 

7 loss 



Colors— 75 Shades 

and 

WHITE FLOSSETTE 



•tfg<3 



a> 



TRADE 



FLAX 



MARK 



>vm 



THE LINEN THREAD COMPANY. 



48 & SO WHITE ST., NEW YORK. 



Boston, 226 Devonshire St. Chicago, 108 & 110 Franklin St. 
Philadelphia, 410 Arch St. St. Louis, 717 & 719 Lucas Ave. 

San Francisco, 517 & 519 Market St. Cincinnati, 1 18 East 6th St.